Walk from Louvre to Concord-Square via Tuileries and Place-Vendôme

The Walk from Louvre to Concord-Square is far from the crowded streets, but still in the very center of Paris. It passes through the Jardins des Tuileries, but also through Place-Vendôme, the home of haute joaillerie and luxury watchmaking.

Promenade Louvre to Place-de-la-Concorde, a haven of peace in a dynamic neighborhood

The Walk from Louvre to Concord-Square is located slightly west of the geographical (and historical) center of Paris.
We’ve chosen to start our walk just outside the Musée du Louvre. After a few hours in the always-busy Louvre, it can be relaxing to take a leisurely stroll through the Jardins des Tuileries, crossing the Carrousel and Tuileries gardens from east to west before reaching the Place de la Concorde (Concord-Square). All the more so as this walk leads to a number of shopping addresses.

Along the promenade: 16 points of interest

The starting point at the Louvre is exceptional. The arrival point at Place de la Concorde is just as exceptional. But the 16 intermediate points of interest we’ve chosen are also worth a visit, some for their historical past (Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel, Jardins des Tuileries, Palais des Tuileries), their topicality (Carrousel-du-Louvre, Musée des arts décoratifs including its fashion, textile and advertising departments), luxury and jewelry (Place Vendôme). Plus 2 historic columns along the way: the Colonne Vendôme (Place-Vendôme) and the Obélisque de Louxor (Place-de-la-Concorde)!

The end of the walk, on the historic Place de la Concorde

The end of the walk from the Louvre ends at Concord-Square. It’s a short stroll of 600 m as the crow flies, bringing back to life the vanished Palais des Tuileries, and making a detour to Place Vendôme, the center of luxury jewelry and watchmaking.

But this end of the walk can open up other perspectives

This walk is located in the immediate vicinity of the luxury districts of Paris. Of course, the Avenue des Champs-Elysées, which ends at Place de la Concorde too, and a few hundred meters away, there is Avenue Montaigne. From the same Place de la Concorde runs the Rue Royale, which cuts 200 m from, the Rue de Faubourg-Saint-Honoré. And Rue de Rivoli runs alongside the Jardins des Tuileries. These are all addresses of luxury and fashion, with the great French and international names all to be found here.

For information: our shopping lists for luxury districts

  • Avenue-Montaigne, Paris, 500 m of luxury and haute couture
  • Champs-Elysées stores: list of 100 stores to visit
  • Rue du Faubourg-Saint-Honoré luxury boutiques not to be missed (Unfinished)
  • Rue Royale boutiques (Unfinished)
  • Boutiques rue de Rivoli (Unfinished)

Our self-guided walks to guide you through these streets

We have other self-guided walks available that link directly with this Louvre Walk to Place-de-la-Concorde:

So, if you follow our various walks, you can start at the Tour-Eiffel, then pass through the Palais de Chaillot, join the Arc-de-Triomphe, walk down the Champs-Elysées, through the Jardins des Tuileries, arrive at the Louvre, visit the historic heart of the Cité-de-Paris, then return to the Musée Pompidou, cut through the Marais to reach the Bastille! Quite a program!

Our walks in Montmartre

In a similar vein, we’ve programmed an exhaustive tour of Montmartre, in the form of 3 walks:

Relaxation breaks” that go hand in hand with the walks on offer

And that’s not all: we’re in the process of compiling “Pauses détente” lists from the shopkeepers you come across as you stroll through the streets of Paris. Our aim is to provide you with a list of reliable, rated merchants (URLs) from which you can make your purchases (gifts, coffee, meals, or shopping) in complete confidence. These will be “specialized” itineraries linked to the routes of our walks. We call these addresses “Relaxation Breaks”: coffee breaks, restaurant breaks, and so on. Much remains to be done. Apart from “Magasins des Champs-Elysées: liste de 100 commerces à visiter”, we also have at your disposal:

Palais du Louvre
rue de Rivoli
75001 Paris

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 39″ N 2° 20′ 09″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86107 2.33572

Access

  • The main entrance to the museum is located in the middle of the Cour Napoléon, under the Pyramid. Access is also possible, under certain conditions, from the Passage Richelieu, which connects the Cour Napoléon to the Place du Palais-Royal, and, for all visitors, from the Carrousel du Louvre shopping center, where there is also an underground parking lot for buses.
  • To distribute the public, the museum communicates the waiting time in real time at its different entrances on its website
  • Métro : Lines 1 et 7, station “Palais-Royal / Musée du Louvre” and Line 14, station “Pyramides” – List of metro stations 
  • Bus : 21 24 27 39 67 48 68 69 72 95and OpenTour
  • RER : lines A and B, station Châtelet – Les Halles
  • Batobus : Louvre stop, quai François Mitterrand
  • Velib near the museum : n°1015 : 2 place A. Malraux, n°1023 : 165 rue Saint-Honoré, n°1014 : 5 rue de l’Echelle, n°1013 : 186 rue Saint-Honoré
  • Parking : By the avenue du général Lemonier, every day from 7am to 11pm.

It is possible to access the Louvre Museum from the Gare du Musée d’Orsay (on the other side of the Seine river).

Short description

Long before the Louvre Museum, the Louvre was a fortress begun in 1190 by King Philip Augustus. It was transformed over several centuries:

  • in 1515: King Francis I (François 1er) turns the former fortress into a Renaissance palace.
  • In 1594, Henri IV undertook the great project of reuniting the Louvre Palace with the Tuileries castle, with two long galleries devoted to the king’s art collections.
  • In the 17th century, the king’s taste was for French classicism: Louis XIV preferred Claude Perrault’s regular and colossal project.
  • Just behind it, the square courtyard, now open to the city, is delicately lit in the evening (open from 7.30-24.00 in summer and from 8.45-22.00 in winter).
  • The Louvre became a museum in 1793, and underwent its final transformations during the Second Empire, when the galleries on either side of the Cour Napoléon were completed.
  • But just as the original plan to link the Louvre palace to the neighboring Tuileries Palace was being completed, the Tuileries Palace was deliberately set on fire by the Communards (Insurrection of 1871).

In 1981, “the Grand Louvre” was one of the major works decided by President Mitterrand. The Richelieu wing (to the north, on the rue de Rivoli side), then still occupied by the Ministry of Finance, became part of the museum. The ministry is transferred to its current location, quai de Bercy. The surface of the museum increases from 30 000 m² to 55 000 m².

We suggest the “Pyramid of the Louvre” (see below) as a starting point for walks “from the Louvre”.

More on Louvre Palace construction :  available in English or French

  • The Medieval Louvre “Palace” construction
  • The beginning of the present Louvre
  • The Louvre Palace construction during the Renaissance
  • The Louvre Palace construction and Catherine de Medici
  • The Louvre, the residence of kings of France
  • The marriage of Marguerite de Valois with Henri III of Navarre
  • The Louvre Palace construction during the Wars of Religion (8 conflicts between 1562 and 1598)
  • The Louvre Palace construction and Henri IV
  • The Louvre under Louis XIII (king from 1610 to 1643) and Louis XIV until 1682
  • The Louvre left by Louis XIV during the Revolution
  • The Louvre Palace construction during the Revolution: birth of Le Louvre Museum
  • Napoleon 1er and the Louvre Palace: continuation of the Grand Dessein
  • The Louvre Palace construction under the Restoration
  • The Second Republic and the completion of the Louvre Palace construction
  • Napoleon III and the Louvre: completion of the Grand Design
  • The Third Republic and the destruction of the Tuileries Palace
  • Contemporary times: the Grand Louvre

Your walk begins without having to walk: the next stop is the Louvre Pyramid, in the middle of the Cour Napoléon, right in front of you.

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Pyramide du Musée Louvre
Cour Napoléon
75001 Paris

Architectes : Leoh Ming Pei for the Pyramid and Michel Macary for the Carrousel du Louvre

Coordinates Pyramide du Louvre (Main museum entrance) – Cours Napoléon, Paris 75001

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 40″ N 2° 20′ 09″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86108 2.33580

Access

  • The main entrance to the museum is located in the center of the Cour Napoléon, under the Pyramid. Access is also possible, under certain conditions, from the Passage Richelieu, which connects the Cour Napoléon to the Place du Palais-Royal, and, for all visitors, from the Carrousel du Louvre shopping center, where there is also an underground parking lot for buses.
  • To distribute the public, the museum communicates the waiting time in real time at its different entrances on its website
  • Métro : Lines 1 et 7, station “Palais-Royal / Musée du Louvre” and Line 14, station “Pyramides” – List of metro stations 
  • Bus : 21 24 27 39 67 48 68 69 72 95and OpenTour
  • RER : lines A and B, station Châtelet – Les Halles
  • Batobus : Louvre stop, quai François Mitterrand
  • Velib near the museum : n°1015 : 2 place A. Malraux, n°1023 : 165 rue Saint-Honoré, n°1014 : 5 rue de l’Echelle, n°1013 : 186 rue Saint-Honoré
  • Parking : By the avenue du général Lemonier, every day from 7am to 11pm.

It is possible to access the Louvre Museum from the Gare du Musée d’Orsay (on the other side of the Seine river).

Short description

From 1981 to 1999, the Louvre palace underwent major modernization work, known as the Grand Louvre.  The Pyramid was a part of the modernization.

The Pyramid-of-the-Louvre is a pyramid made of glass and metal, located in the middle of the Cour Napoléon of the Louvre Museum in Paris. It is the main entrance to the museum. It was inaugurated by the President of the Republic François Mitterrand on March 4, 1988 (2 months before the presidential elections of 1988!) and a second time on March 29, 1989 by the same President Mitterrand. But the works were finished only 4 years later in 1993. Who knows why to make 2 inaugurations “in advance”?

The decision to build this Pyramid was the subject of a battle of influences: first the choice of a Sino-American architect and then the shape of the proposed building, modern in a historical context.

The technology used is new and also daring. The metal structure of the Pyramid-of-the-Louvre that supports the glass cladding is made of steel and aluminum and weighs 200 tons. It consists of a steel structure weighing 95 tons and an aluminum frame weighing 105 tons.

In the end, not one but 5 pyramids were built, one of which was inverted (the one above the Carrousel du Louvre).

More on Pyrmide du Louvre :  available in English or French

  • The battle of the Pyramid-of-the-Louvre
  • The Louvre Pyramid and technology
  • Not one but 5 pyramids in all – The Inverted Pyramid
  • Laminated glass: a challenge
  • The ecological lighting of the Pyramid-of-the-Louvre
  • “Pyramid” project to expand the Louvre’s visitor capacity

To continue your walk: a visit to the Louvre. See the following Point of Interest for general information on the Louvre Museum.

 

 

 

 

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Louvre Museum
9 rue de Rivoli
75001 Paris

Coordinates Pyramide du Louvre (Main museum entrance) – Cours Napoléon, Paris 75001

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 40″ N 2° 20′ 09″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86108 2.33580

Access

  • The main entrance to the museum is located in the middle of the Cour Napoléon, under the Pyramid. Access is also possible, under certain conditions, from the Passage Richelieu, which connects the Cour Napoléon to the Place du Palais-Royal, and, for all visitors, from the Carrousel du Louvre shopping center, where there is also an underground parking lot for buses.
  • To distribute the public, the museum communicates the waiting time in real time at its different entrances on its website
  • Métro : Lines 1 et 7, station “Palais-Royal / Musée du Louvre” and Line 14, station “Pyramides” – List of metro stations 
  • Bus : 21 24 27 39 67 48 68 69 72 95and OpenTour
  • RER : lines A and B, station Châtelet – Les Halles
  • Batobus : Louvre stop, quai François Mitterrand
  • Velib near the museum : n°1015 : 2 place A. Malraux, n°1023 : 165 rue Saint-Honoré, n°1014 : 5 rue de l’Echelle, n°1013 : 186 rue Saint-Honoré
  • Parking : By the avenue du général Lemonier, every day from 7am to 11pm.

It is possible to access the Louvre Museum from the Gare du Musée d’Orsay (on the other side of the Seine river).

Short description

The Louvre became a museum on August 10, 1793 with an exhibition of 537 paintings. The to day Musée du Louvre contains more than 380,000 objects and displays 35,000 works of art in eight curatorial departments, with more than 60,600 square meters (652,000 sq ft) dedicated to the permanent collection.

The Louvre Museum offers a chronology from Antiquity to 1848 and a geographical area extending from Western Europe to Iran, via Greece, Egypt, and the Near East.

The Louvre Museum has eight departments: Oriental Antiquities, Egyptian Antiquities (Recently Renovated), Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Antiquities, Islamic Arts, Sculptures, Works of Art, Paintings, and Graphic Arts.

Almost all the works on display at the Louvre are available for consultation on the Internet.

The works in the Louvre Museum are varied in nature: paintings, sculptures, drawings, ceramics, archaeological objects, and objets d’art, among others. Among the museum’s most famous pieces are the Code of Hammurabi (Babylonian legal text dated around 1750 BC, to date the most complete code of laws known from ancient Mesopotamia), the Venus de Milo, Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, Eugene Delacroix’s Liberty Leading the People, or the Victory of Samothrace restored in 2014.

In Paris, several national museums complement the Louvre’s collections, including the Musée d’Orsay (19th century) and the Musée du Jeu de l’Orangerie (mainly Impressionists).

More on  The Louvre Museum :  available in English or French

  • The Louvre: a Universalist Museum
  • Collections of the Louvre Museum
  • Organization of the exhibition rooms – to plan your visit
  • Opening hours and closing periods
  • Rates and conditions, réservations

To continue your walk, walk 100 m north-west along the Cour Napoléon, towards the Arc-de-Triomphe du Carrousel and the Jardin des Tuileries.

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Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel
Place du Carrousel
75001, Paris

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 43″ N 2° 19′ 58″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86182 2.33282

 

Access

  • Metro: line 1 and 7 (Palais Royal – Musée du Louvre station)
  • RER: line C (Musée D’Orsay Station)
  • Bus: 27, 39, 68, 69, 72, 73, 85, 95

Short description

The Arc-de-Triomphe du Carrousel, is a monument inaugurated on August 15, 1808 by Napoleon 1st, on the place du Carrousel. It was right in front of the main entrance of the Tuileries Palace, now disappeared, burned in 1871 by the Communards.

The name Carrousel comes from a military horse show ( the Grand Carrousel), given in this place by Louis XIV, from June 5 to 6, 1662, on the occasion of the birth of his son Louis of France.

The monument was erected, between 1806 and 1810, in front of the Tuileries Palace to which it serves as the entrance of honor. It is a copy, in 3/4 scale, of the arch of Constantine (313-315 AC) in Rome.

The Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel has a height of 14.60 meters (45 feet) and its base is a rectangle of 19.60 meters (60 feet) by 6.65 meters (20 feet and a half). It is crowned by an imposing frieze in marble (Italian cherry), sculpted and engraved and the bas-reliefs illustrate the events of Napoleon’s 1805 campaign.

It is surmounted by the “Quadriga of the Arch of Triumph of the Carrousel” (4 horses in the center) harnessed to a chariot and surrounded by 2 gilded lead statues of Peace and Victory.

The 4 horses “Quadriga of the Arch of Triumph of the Carrousel” was the horses of Saint Mark, a carriage adorning the top of the main door of the Saint Mark’s Basilica in Venice and coming from the sack of Constantinople by the Venetians. Napoleon then General brought them back in 1798 during his Italian campaign.

Following the defeat of Napoleon in 1815 at Waterloo, the original quadriga of the Venetians (which they had stolen from Constantinople) was returned to the Austrians who gave it back to Venice. It is today above the main entrance of the Basilica of Saint Mark in Venice. Finally a very long journey!

This means that what is seen today above the Arch of the Carrousel of Paris is a copy made in 1828,

More on “Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel:  available in English or French

  • Opening hours and closing periods
  • The construction of the Arc-de-Triomphe of Carrousel
  • The Arc-de-Triomphe of Carrousel after the fire of the Tuileries Palace
  • The decoration of the Arc-de-Triomphe of Carrousel over the years
    • The other decorations of the Arc-de-Triomphe of Carrousel today
    • The allegories and renown
    • Fronticipes on the Arc-de-Triomphe of Carrousel
  • Anecdote

The next part of your walk is right in front of you, the Jardin du Carrousel.

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Jardin du Carrousel
6 Av. du Général Lemonnier
75001 Paris

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 43″ N 2° 19′ 55″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86202 2.33225

Access

  • Métro: line 1  and 7 (Station Palais Royal – Musée du Louvre)
  • RER: line C (Station Musée D’Orsay)
  • Bus: 27, 39, 68, 69, 72, 73, 85, 95

Short description

The Carrousel garden is a space located east of the Tuileries garden, on the Louvre side, between the Marsan wing and the Flore wing of the Louvre Museum.

The Tuileries Palace burned down in 1871, razed in 1883 and never rebuilt, was located approximately where the Avenue du Général Lemonnier is today.

About twenty statues of the sculptor Aristide Maillol are spread in the garden since 1964. You can admire them while walking around. They are listed in our post “Carrousel Garden between Louvre and Tuileries, 20 sculptures by Maillol” with their geographical coordinates to facilitate your search.

More on Carrousel Garden :  available in English or French

  • Map of the Carrousel Garden
  • History and location of the garden
  • Liste and location of the statues of Aristide Maillol in the garden of the Carrousel

Your walk then calls on your imagination to evoke the vanished Palais des Tuileries.

 

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Palais des Tuileries
Jardin des Tuileries
75001 Paris

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 44″ N 2° 19′ 52″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86325 2.32561

Access

  • Métro : Station Palais Royal – Louvre (Lines 1 and 7) – Station Tuileries (Line 1) – Station Concorde (Lignes 1, 8 et 12)
  • RER
  • Bus : 21, 27, 39, 42, 45,48, 67, 68, 69, 72, 73, 81, 94, 95
  • Parkings : Carrousel du Louvre, rue des Pyramides
  • Parking cars : Carrousel du Louvre

Short description

The Palais des Tuileries is a palace now destroyed whose construction began in 1564 under the impetus of Catherine de Medici. On this site were three tile factories established in 1372.

To sharpen your imagination, we have grouped 3 historical photos in the full post on the Tuileries Palace: before 1871, during and after the fire.

Enlarged under the successive reigns of the kings of France, it had a huge facade (266 meters long) and became a royal residence (Henri IV, Louis XIV, Louis XV, Louis XVI or Louis XVIII), then an imperial one (Napoleon I and Napoleon III).

Its destruction is the result of an arson attack on May 23, 1871 by the Communards Jules-Henri-Marius Bergeret, Victor Bénot and Etienne Boudin. The ruins of the Tuileries Palace were destroyed in 1883.

Le Palais des Tuileries est un palais aujourd’hui détruit dont la construction commença en 1564 sous l’impulsion de Catherine de Médicis. A cet emplacement se trouvaient trois fabriques de tuiles établies en 1372.

More on Tuileries Palace : available in English or French

  • Origin of this building today ghost
  • The Tuileries Palace in its entirety
  • The history of France within the walls of the Tuileries Palace until the Revolution
  • The Tuileries Palace under the 1st Empire
  • The birth of Napoleon’s heir and the end of the 1st Empire
  • The Restoration and the July Monarchy (1815-1848)
  • The Tuileries Palace under the Second Empire
  • Fire and destruction of the Tuileries Palace
  • Demolition of the Tuileries Palace and its auction
  • The dispersion of the ruins of the Tuileries Palace
  • Reconstruction projects
  • What happened to the arsonists of the Tuileries Palace

To continue your walk, go back a few metres to the Arc-de-Triomphe du Carrousel, then take Place du Carrousel in a north-easterly direction, opposite the direction towards the Seine. After 50 m, turn left into rue de Rivoli. About 60 m further on is the entrance to the shopping center, your next stop if you wish.

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Carrousel du Louvre
99 rue de Rivoli
75001 Paris

Architect : Michel Macary

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 40″ N 2° 20′ 07″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86272 2.33483

Access

    • Metro – Lines 1 and 7 (Palais Royal – Musée du Louvre station)
    • Bus – 21, 27, 39, 67, 68, 69, 72, 95 (Stops “Palais Royal – Musée du Louvre” or “Palais Royal – Comédie Française” or “Musée du Louvre”)
    • Parking (670 spaces). Parc Carrousel Louvre” can be reached via avenue du Général Lemonnier, 75001 Paris
      • From Rue de Rivoli: turn left at the traffic lights at Place des Pyramides
      • From Quai des Tuileries: turn left at the Pont-Royal traffic lights.
      • From Pont-Royal: go straight on, direction “Opéra”, then turn right

In all three cases: enter the tunnel; at the traffic light at the lowest point of the tunnel, enter the central ramp marked
central ramp marked “Parc Carrousel Louvre”.

  • Autolib’: 4 Autolib’ stations are available in the vicinity of Carrousel du Louvre
    • 3 Rue Saint Roch 75001 Paris
    • 12-15 Rue des Pyramides 75001 Paris
    • 4 Rue Croix des Petits Champs 75001 Paris
    • 2 Rue de l’Amiral Coligny 75001 Paris

Click here for more information.

  • Cab: take a cab to Place André Malraux 75001 Paris. Click here to book online.
  • Velib’: 4 Vélib’ stations are available in the vicinity of the Carrousel du Louvre:
    • 165, rue Saint Honoré 75001 Paris
    • 5, rue de l’échelle 75001 Paris
    • 2, place André Malraux 75001 Paris
      186, rue Saint Honoré 75001 Paris
  • 3 pedestrian entrances serve the Carrousel du Louvre:
    • 99, rue de Rivoli 75001 Paris
    • Exit from Musée du Louvre, place de la Pyramide Inversée
    • 2 entrances from the Jardin des Tuileries, stairs on either side of the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel.

Short description

Also as part of the changes brought about by the “Grand Louvre” project, an underground commercial space called the Carrousel-du-Louvre was created by Michel Macary (in reference to the nearby Place du Carrousel and above). It includes a historical and cultural space (with direct access to the Louvre museum and a 600-seat amphitheater of the Louvre School – Rohan amphitheater), a 10,200 m2 shopping mall, open on Sundays and with many big-name stores.

More on Carrousel-of-the-Louvre :  available in English or French

  • Construction of the Carrousel-of-the-Louvre, included in the renovation of the Grand Louvre
  • 34 shops and 11 restaurants at the Carrousel-of-the-Louvre
  • Shopping destination at the Carrousel-of-the-Louvre?
  • A shopping and fashion experience to discover!
  • Carrousel du Louvre, a special place, combining fashion and culture
  • Statues from the now-defunct Palais des Tuileries
  • The 5th pyramid, the inverted one

Continue your walk and 70 m along rue de Rivoli, you’ll find the entrance to the Musée des Arts décoratifs.

 

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Musée des arts décoratifs
107 Rue de Rivoli
75001 PARIS

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 46″ N 2° 20′ 79″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86323 2.33316

Access

  • Métro : Palais Royal – Louvre
  • RER
  • Bus : 21, 27, 39, 48, 68, 69, 72, 81, 95
  • Parkings : Carrousel du Louvre, rue des Pyramides
  • Parking cars : Carrousel du Louvre

Short description

The 1981 Grand Louvre project also included the renovation of the Musée des Arts décoratifs.

It now includes a set of 4 complementary museums: Musée des Arts décoratifs (reference), the former Musée de la Mode et du Textile, the former Musée de la Publicité and the Musée Nissim de Camondo.

The main part of the museum is at 107 rue de Rivoli. It includes a library (107Rivoli Library) and a boutique (107Rivoli Boutique).

More on the Museum of arts-décoratifs :  available in English or French

  • The Museum of arts-decoratifs at 107 rue de Rivoli
  • Fashion and Textile Museum Department (part of the Museum of arts-décoratifs)
  • Advertising Department (integrated into the Museum of arts-décoratifs since 1999)
  • 107Rivoli Library
  • The 107Rivoli Boutique of the Museum of arts-décoratifs
  • Nissim de Camondo Museum located at 63 rue de Monceau – 75008 Paris
  • Les Ateliers du Carrousel
  • Camondo School at 266, boulevard Raspail, 75014 Paris

On leaving the Museum, turn left 70 m along the road, still heading for Place de la Concorde, and turn right into Rue des Pyramides for 60 m, then left into Rue Saint-Honoré. Your next point of interest is 40 m away.

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Église Saint-Roch
296 rue Saint-Honoré
Postal Address : 24 Rue Saint-Roch
75001 PARIS
Tél : 01 42 44 13 20

Architectes : Jacques Le Mercier, Jules Hardouin-Mansart, Robert de Cotte

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 55 N 2° 19′ 57″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86501 2.33241

 

Access

  • Métro : line 1 (Station Tuileries), line 14 (Station Pyramides), line 7 (Station Pyramides)
  • RER : line C (Station Musée D’Orsay)
  • Bus : lines 20, 21, 68, 72

Short description

The Saint-Roch Church was built between 1653 and 1722 near the Tuileries Gardens. Note the absence of bell tower resulting from demolition works undertaken in the 19th century during the development of the passage Saint-Roch.

At the time of the French Revolution, this church was at the center of the fighting between factions, as shown by the facade riddled with impacts. Revolutionary groups, such as the Jacobin Club and the Feuillants Club, used to gather in the cloisters of the rue Saint-Honoré. The confrontations of that time are still visible.

It was also along this street that the vehicles that took the condemned from the Conciergerie prison to the Place de la Concorde where they were executed circulated.

Today, the Saint-Roch Church is the parish of the artists. Recently, quite a few funerals of them took place at the St Roch church.

Saint-Roch Church has always been the last resting place of personalities in history : André le Nôtre, Pierre Corneille, Fragonard, etc.

It still houses paintings and sculptures from convents destroyed during the Revolution. It is a kind of museum of religious art from the 18th and 19th centuries.

Numerous concerts are organized on weekday evenings and Sunday afternoons.

More on Saint-Roch church :  available in English or French

  • Opening hours and closing periods
  • Concerts à l’Eglise Saint Roch: Bureau des concerts
  • The Saint-Roch Church, the Revolution and its aftermath
  • Today, the Saint-Roch Church is the parish of the artists
  • Recent funerals of artists at Saint-Roch Church
  • Saint-Roch Church has always been the last resting place of personalities in history
  • The Saint-Roch Church and the arts
    • Chapel of Calvary
    • Chapel of the Communion
    • Chapel of the Virgin
    • Choir
    • Deambulatory and transept
    • Nave of Saint-Roch Church
    • Chapel of the Baptismal Font
    • Chapel of St. John the Baptist
    • The great organs of Saint-Roch Church
    • The choir organ
  • Paintings and stained glass windows (list)

Continue along rue Saint-Honoré, still heading towards Place de la Concorde, until you reach rue de Castiglione. Turn right. Place Vendôme is 30 m away.

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Colonne Vendôme
Place Vendôme
75001 Paris

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 52′ 03″ N 2° 19′ 46″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86757 2.32954

Access

  • Metro
    • ligne 1 – Tuileries station
    • Lignes 7 and 14 – Pyramide station
    • Lignes 7 and 8: Opera station
  • Bus – lignes 72 et 52

Short description

The Column Vendôme was erected by order of Napoleon 1st, from 1806 to 1810 to commemorate the battle of Austerlitz, then destroyed during the Paris Commune in 1871 before being rebuilt as we know it today. The column was named the column of the Grande Armée.

The dedicatory inscription, written in an antique manner, means “Napoleon Emperor Augustus consecrated to the glory of the Great Army this column formed of the bronze conquered on the enemy during the war of Germany, won under his command in 1805 in the space of three months“.

Its barrel, consisting of 98 stone drums (rings), is covered with a cast bronze facing of 1,200 cannons taken from the Russian and Austrian armies. This number is probably exaggerated by propaganda, historians count about 130 guns taken from Austerlitz. An interior staircase leads to a platform located under the statue at the top.

During the insurrection of the Paris Commune, which lasted from March 18, 1871, until the “Bloody Week” from May 21 to 28, 1871, the motivations became more radical. The column was finally knocked down on 16 May 1871, not without difficulty, 11 days before the Commune was crushed.

The re-construction of the Column Vendôme begun in 1873 and completed in 1875 – at the expense of the painter Gustave Courbet (whom he never paid). He was condemned because he was at the origin of the destruction of the previous one.

More on Vendome column :  available in English or French (listing à faire)

  • The “Vendome column” located in the center of the square of the same name
  • The idea of Place Vendome column
  • Construction of the column
  • The history of the statue at the top of the Vendome column
  • The consequences of the Commune de Paris in the history of Column Vendôme
  • The reconstruction of the Vendome column and Gustave Corbet
  • The restoration of the column (2014 – 2015)

To continue your walk, retrace your steps along rue de Castiglione, towards the Seine, until you come to a 100 m intersection with rue de Rivoli and the Jardin des Tuileries.

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Jardin des Tuileries
Place de la Concorde
75001 Paris
Tel. +33 (0) 1 40 20 53 17
https://www.louvre.fr

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 44″ N 2° 19′ 52″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86413 2.32831

Access

  • Metro – Concorde Station (Lines 1, 8 and 12), Tuileries Station (Line 1)
  • RER – Musée d’Orsay
  • Bus – 21, 27, 42, 68, 69, 72, 73, 84, 94, 95
  • Velib’ : stations n°1018, n°1017, n°1019.

Short description

The Tuileries-Garden separates the Carrousel garden and the Louvre museum from the Place de la Concorde.

The Tuileries garden dates from 1564, at the same time as the Tuileries Palace starting construction. But from 1664, the Tuileries-Garden was entirely redesigned by André Le Nôtre, the famous gardener of King Louis XIV. A fountain, a menagerie and a grotto decorated by the famous ceramist Bernard Palissy decorate the garden. In the years 1605-1625, an orangery and a silkworm farm were added.

It is in 1783 that took place the first ascent of people in a gas balloon. A plaque, located today on the right when entering the garden, marks the memory of this event. During the Revolution, the Tuileries-Garden was the witness of the great events of which the palace itself was the theater, notably the “capture” of the Tuileries on August 10, 1792.

The rue de Rivoli was laid out at the beginning of the 19th century. Later during the development of the Quai des Tuileries, a supporting wall was built along the waterfront terrace. At the western corners of the garden, Napoleon III had two identical buildings built:

  • a jeu de paume to the northwest which now houses a museum of contemporary art and photography, the Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Paume.
  • an orangery in the southwest. Today it houses a museum of modern art, the Musée de l’Orangerie

Over the years, many other events have taken place in Tuileries-Garden. The Tuileries Palace was destroyed by fire during the Paris Commune in 1871, in 1883, the ruins of the Tuileries Palace are razed, during the 1878 World’s Fair, Henri Giffard had thousands of people fly in a giant tethered balloon, during the First World War, 2 shell launched by the German cannon Grosse Bertha exploded in the Jardin-des-Tuileries and near the Orangery terrace, during the Second World War, a part of the Tuileries Gardens was transformed into a vegetable garden, on August 25, 1944, german General von Choltitz, commander of the “Groß-Paris” surrender after violent fighting. Captain Branet took the nearby Hotel Meurice, on rue de Rivoli, which was also the headquarters of the German occupation forces.

Eighty sculptures are exposed in the Tuileries-Garden. List and location on “Tuileries-Garden“.

More on Tuileries-Garden : available in English or French

  • Map of the Tuileries garden
  • Opening hours of the garden
  • Tuileries Festival (Opening hours)
  • The evolution of the Jardin des Tuileries
  • The history in progress of the Tuileries-Garden
  • The sculptures exposed in the Tuileries-Garden
  • And to refresh yourself at the Tuileries-Garden ?

Stroll through the Jardin des Tuileries to enjoy the water basins, heading northwest. The total length of the Jardin des Tuileries is around 700 m. In this direction, you’ll automatically arrive at the Place de la Concorde.

 

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Place de la Concorde
Quartier des Champs Elysées
75008 Paris

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 56″ N 2° 19′ 16″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86515 2.32223

Access

  • Metro: lines 1, 8 et 12 – Station Concorde
  • RER: closest lines: A et C
  • Bus: lines 42 45 52 72 73 84 94 (RATP)
  • Noctilien N11 N24. (Night bus line)
  • Tootbus Paris (Special bus line)

Short description

The Concord Square, with 8.64 hectares, is the largest square in Paris.

The Concord Square is located a few hundred meters from the Louvre, at the bottom of the Avenue des Champs-Élysées and adjoins the Jardin de Tuilerie. It is distinguished today by the Luxor Obelisk in its center, 3,300 years old (13th century with J-C) and erected in 1836 on Concord Square – See our article “Luxor Obelisk, Place de la Concorde, a present from Egypt“.
In the beginning of the 18th century, it was only an esplanade surrounded by a ditch and two large open sewers. Later (1770), it was the scene of a dramatic accident where 133 people died as a result of the panic caused by a fire stated by a falling rocket. It was in honor of the wedding of the Dauphin (the future Louis XVI) and the Archduchess Marie-Antoinette of Austria.
A few years later, during the Revolution, the Concord Square was one of the bloodiest places: 1 119 people died there out of the 2 498 guillotined in Paris. Among them, king Louis XVI and the queen Marie-Antoinette died on Concord Square.
Between 1836 and 1846, the square was transformed by the architect Jacques-Ignace Hittorff. He added two monumental fountains (which had the audacity to be made of cast iron) on either side of the Luxor obelisk and surrounded the square with lampposts and rostral columns. They also evoke the emblem of the City of Paris. Architecture surrounding the Concord Square, the monumental fountains and The statues add to its splendor.

To know more about the Concord Square : in English or in French

  • Concord Square: an exceptional location in Paris
  • The beginning, a painful history, in connection with the future Louis XVI
  • The Revolution of sinister memory
  • The 19th century and the Concord Square
  • Architecture surrounding the Concord Square
  • The statues of the Concord Square
  • The monumental fountains of the Concord Square

Enjoy the panoramic view of the Place de la Concorde and the balance of the buildings. The next part of your walk is already in front of you:

The Musée de l’Orangerie, at the corner on your left of the Jardin des Tuileries (Seine side). Point of interest 13
The Musée du Jeu de Paume at the opposite right-hand corner of the Jardin des Tuileries. Point of interest 15
The Luxor Obelisk in the center of the square. Point of interest 14
The Musée de Hôtel-de-la-Marine next to the Musée du Jeu de Paume. Point of interest 16

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Musée de l’Orangerie – Orangerie Museum
Jardin des Tuileries (côté Seine – on the Seine side)
Place de la Concorde
75001 Paris

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48°51’51.7″ N 2°19’18.4″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86435 2.32176

Architectes : Auguste Perret, Antoine Bourdelle, Henry Van de Velde
Interior decoration
: Bourdelle (bronze and frescoes). Maurice Denis
Visiting the Orangerie Museum : conditions, prices and opening hours – see below “More on Orangerie Museum”  available in English or in French
Access

  • Metro: lines 1, 8 et 12 – Station Concorde
  • RER: closest lines: A et C
  • Bus: lines 42 45 52 72 73 84 94 (RATP)
  • Noctilien N11 N24. (Night bus line)
  • Tootbus Paris (Special bus line)

Short description

Orangerie museum is known for the Water Lilies of Claude Monet that it shelters. The Water Lilies cycle occupied Claude Monet for three decades, from the end of the 1890s, until his death in 1926, at the age of 86.
Orangerie museum also contains in its basement the Jean Walter and Paul Guillaume collection, devoted to the great names of the 20th century: Renoir, Cézanne, Matisse, Picasso, Soutine and a few others. They are paintings of the Impressionist (XIXe) and Modernisme (XXe) periods.
Outside of the building are also sculptures by Rodin and a few others.

To know more about the Orangerie  Museum : in English or in French

  • Orangerie Museum: first the Water Lilies by Claude Monet
  • There are not only Claude Monet’s Water Lilies to see at the Orangerie Museum !
  • The history of the Water Lilies and Claude Monet
  • The installation of the Water Lilies at the Orangerie Museum
  • The Jean Walter and Paul Guillaume collection
  • The House of Monet in Giverny

To continue your stroll: once you’ve left the Musée de l’Orangenrie, you can choose from the following points of interest, depending on the order of your visits.

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Obélisque de Louxor
Place de la Concorde
75008 Paris

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 56″ N 2° 19′ 16″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86522 2.32102

Access

  • Metro: lines 1, 8 et 12 – Station Concorde
  • RER: closest lines: Line A : Station Charles de Gaulle/Étoile – Line C : Station Invalides
  • Bus: lines 24, 42, 72, 73, 84, 94
  • Noctilien N11 and N24. (Night bus line)
  • Tootbus Paris (Special bus line)
  • Parking : Jardin des Tuileries et Carrousel (accès par le quai des Tuileries ou la rue de Rivoli)  – Rue du Mont-Thabor, rue des Pyramides
  • Stations Vélib’ : 119, rue de Lille – 2, rue Cambon

The Luxor obelisk is part of a gift including 2 obelisks, the 2nd will never be brought to Paris. The gift to king Charles X and France of Mehmet Ali, Viceroy of Egypt, was made at the instigation of Baron Taylor and Jean-François Champollion (1790-1832 – the first to translate the hieroglyphics).
The donation of the Obelisk was made in early 1830. It was transported by a special barge called “Luxor” towed by the steamship and sailboat “Sphinx”. It finally arrived in Paris in 1834 after a stopover in Toulon and Rouen and the ascent of the Seine. It was erected on October 25, 1836.
Its weight is 222 tons. The stone base of 240 tons is from Brittany, western France, not Egypt.
Atop the Obelisk is a small pyramid called “pyramidion”. Also to be noted that the Obelissk is also a huge sundial: Roman numerals, lines are traced and metal inlays sealed on the ground of the Concord Square.

To know more about the Luxor Obelisk : in English or in French

  • Luxor obelisk: a gift from Mehmet Ali, Viceroy of Egypt
  • The builders of the Luxor Obelisk
  • Transporting the Obelisk from Luxor to Paris
  • Erection of the Obelisk on October 25, 1836, in the middle of the Concord Square
  • The stone base is from Brittany, western France, not Egypt
  • Hieroglyphics on the faces of the Obelisk
  • The Pyramid atop the Obelisk
  • A sundial or an Obelisk?

To continue your walk, simply go to the other corner of the Jardins des Tuileries (on the buildings side), where you’ll find the Musée du Jeu-de-Paume.

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Musée du Jeu de Paume – Jeu de Paume Museum
1, place de la Concorde, jardin des Tuileries
75001 Paris
Tél : 33 (0)1 47 03 12 50

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 57″ N 2° 19′ 26″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86622 2.32320

Visiting the Jeu de Paume Museum : conditions, prices and opening hours – see below “More on Jeu de Paume Museum”  available in English or in French
Access

  • Metro: lines 1, 8 et 12 – Station Concorde
  • RER: closest lines: A et C
  • Bus: lines 42 45 52 72 73 84 94 (RATP)
  • Noctilien N11 N24. (Night bus line)
  • Tootbus Paris (Special bus line)

Short description

The today Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Paume was inaugurated on June 17, 1991. Without a permanent collection, the exhibitions are exclusively temporary and concern the art of the second half of the 20th century. In 2004, by ministerial decision, the Jeu de Paume became a museum devoted to photography and image, video art, experimental cinema and documentary film.

To know more about the Jeu-de-Paume Museum : in English or in French

  • Jeu-de-Paume Museum origin : doing sport
  • Jeu-de-Paume Museum and its different uses throughout history
  • The last destination of the Museum

Your last stop on this walk is a few meters from the Musée du Jeu de Paume, on the corner of Place de la Concorde and Rue de Rivoli.

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Hôtel de la Marine
2 Place de la Concorde
Paris – 75008

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 39″ N 2° 19′ 49″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86667 2.32255

Architecte : Ange-Jacques Gabriel
Access

  • Metro: lines 1, 8 et 12 – Station Concorde
  • RER: closest lines: A et C
  • Bus: lines 42 45 52 72 73 84 94 (RATP)
  • Noctilien N11 N24. (Night bus line)
  • Tootbus Paris (Special bus line)

Short description

Visiting the Hotel de la Marine : conditions, prices and opening hours – see below “More on Hôtel-de-la-Marine Museum”  available in English or in French
The Hôtel-de-la-Marine is a new museum inaugurated in June 2021, in a magnificent 18th century historic building. From its loggia, visitors have a breathtaking view of the Place de la Concorde. A “Garde-meuble de la Couronne” building under the old regime (the forerunner of today’s Mobilier national) and then the home of the Ministry of the Navy, the Hôtel de la Marine bears witness to the changes in France, from royalty to the present day.

The Furniture Store of the Crown of France

The hotel was built between 1757 and 1774 to house the Garde-Meuble de la Couronne from 1772. It was organized into three exhibition rooms:

  • the Salle d’Armes (collection of armor and weapons of the kings of France – today in the Invalides and the Louvre);
  • the Galerie des Grands Meubles (fabrics and collection of tapestries unique in the world – now in the Louvre and the Mobilier National);
  • the Hall of Jewels (vases of colored stones and rock crystal, silverware, diplomatic gifts, as well as the crown jewels, including diamonds set in jewel cases).

The course of history in the Hôtel-de-la-Marine

  • The Revolution. The Hôtel de la Marine was looted for weapons by Parisian rioters on the morning of July 13, 1789.
  • Establishment of the Navy. Later in 1789 and until 2015
  • January 21, 1793: the Intendant of the Garde Meuble de la Couronne can attend from his office the execution of King Louis XVI
  • October 16, 1793, from the same place, he can also attend the execution of Queen Marie-Antoinette
  • October 24, 1793, it is in the Hotel that was signed the minutes of the execution of the former queen Marie-Antoinette.

The theft of the Crown diamonds

The theft of the century, in the middle of the revolution! This theft took place during the week of September 11 to 17, 1792, over several days, by about forty people, in the chaos that reigned in this revolutionary period. Between 1792 and 1794, two thirds of the jewels were found, including the “Regent”, the “Sancy”, and most of the “Mazarins”. Some of the stones were permanently lost. The collection, deposited in the National Treasury, was estimated at 17 million pounds.

Abolition of slavery

The decree of abolition of slavery was signed on April 27, 1848 by Victor Schœlcher, Under-Secretary of State for the Navy in the provisional government. This government was the result of the Revolution of 1848, which had driven King Louis Philippe I from power.

The 4 most important balls of the 19th century in the Hôtel-de-la-Marine

  • February 27, 1802: the ball of Europe
  • June 1825: the ball of the coronation of Charles X
  • February 12, 1866: the ball of Napoleon III
  • October 18, 1893: the ball for the Russian squadron

The visit of the Hôtel-de-La-Marine

The proposed tours are special and original: the tours are done with the sound of the “Confident”, a connected headset that tells the story along the routes. Four audio tours are offered: three of 1h30 each and one of 45 mn, for immersive visits at the heart of more than 250 years of history of the monument:

    • The Grand Tour: available in 3 versions to explore the monument in its entirety in 1.5 hours:
        • Time Travel,
        • Age of Enlightenment and
        • Family.
    • Salons & loggia: for a 45-minute discovery of the ceremonial salons and the most beautiful view of Paris.

The loggia adjoining the salons d’honneur of the Hôtel de la Marine, offers a breathtaking view of the Place de la Concorde, the Tuileries gardens, the Musée d’Orsay, the Grand Palais and the Eiffel Tower.

The Hôtel-de-la-Marine Museum will also host the Al Thani Collection from Qatar for the next 20 years, in parallel with a program of temporary thematic exhibitions. These presentations follow an agreement between the Centre des monuments nationaux and the Al Thani Collection Foundation.
The Al Thani Collection is among the most prestigious private collections in the world. It includes an exceptional group of works of art covering a long period from Antiquity to the present day. Encyclopedic in its approach and representative of a rich array of cultures and civilizations, the Collection celebrates the creativity and universal power of art through the ages. Previously, these works have been shown in temporary traveling exhibitions at major international institutions, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, and the National Museum in Tokyo.

More on Hôtel-de-la-Marine Museum:  available in English or in French

  • Beginning of the history of what will become the Hôtel-de-la-Marine
  • The layout of the Place Louis XV (today Place de la Concorde)
  • 2 palaces, one of which was used for the King’s furniture: the Hôtel-de-la-Marine of today
  • The organization of the Garde-Meuble Royal before the Hôtel-de-la-Marine
  • The stewardship is not forgotten in the Royal Furniture Guard
  • Opening of the Garde-Meuble Royal to the public
  • The Revolution: a balcony on History and a change of destination
  • The Crown Jewels of France
  • The heist of the century of September 11-16, 1792
  • Who benefited from this crime?
  • The execution of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette seen from the balcony of the Garde-Meuble building
  • The end of the Garde-Meuble and the arrival of the Navy in 1798
  • Return to normality after the Revolution: February 27, 1802, and the Ball of Europe at the Hôtel-de-la-Marine
  • Another memorable ball at the Hôtel-de-la-Marine: that of the coronation of Charles X on May 29, 1825
  • The Obelisk of Luxor was erected October 25, 1836
  • Abolition of slavery on April 27, 1848, in the diplomatic lounge
  • The Procession of Nations February 12, 1866: all at the Hôtel-de-la-Marine
  • 18 October 1893: a ball this time for the Russian squadron
  • The Second World War at the Hôtel-de-la-Marine
  • The gradual departure of the Navy between 1947-2015
  • Bicentenary of the Revolution in 1989 from the loggia of the Hôtel-de-la-Marine
  • 2016-2020: the innovative project of the Centre des Monuments Nationaux
  • The results of the renovations
  • What can be seen in the Hôtel-de-la-Marine
  • A replica of the Hôtel de la Marine in the United States

This walk from the Arc-de-Triomphe to the Place de la Concorde is now over.
We’d like to thank you for your confidence in us, and hope you enjoyed the walk to the full. Don’t forget that you can rest in the nearby Jardin des Tuileries before continuing on your way.
Or you can continue by visiting the Boutiques on Rue Royale (a few meters away) or Rue du Faubourg-Saint-Nonoré (150 m away) or Rue de Rivoli (30 m away). To find out more, see the last 3 paragraphs “Other lists of luxury shops near the Champs-Elysées” of this article by clicking on “Shops on the Champs-Elysées: list of 100 shops to visit“.

We wish you an excellent stay in Paris.

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