Résumé

The Tuileries-Garden separates the Carrousel garden and the Louvre museum from the Place de la Concorde.

The Tuileries garden dates from 1564, at the same time as the Tuileries Palace starting construction. But from 1664, the Tuileries-Garden was entirely redesigned by André Le Nôtre, the famous gardener of King Louis XIV. A fountain, a menagerie and a grotto decorated by the famous ceramist Bernard Palissy decorate the garden. In the years 1605-1625, an orangery and a silkworm farm were added.

It is in 1783 that took place the first ascent of people in a gas balloon. A plaque, located today on the right when entering the garden, marks the memory of this event. During the Revolution, the Tuileries-Garden was the witness of the great events of which the palace itself was the theater, notably the "capture" of the Tuileries on August 10, 1792.

The rue de Rivoli was laid out at the beginning of the 19th century. Later during the development of the Quai des Tuileries, a supporting wall was built along the waterfront terrace. At the western corners of the garden, Napoleon III had two identical buildings built:

a jeu de paume to the northwest which now houses a museum of contemporary art and photography, the Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Paume.
an orangery in the southwest. Today it houses a museum of modern art, the Musée de l'Orangerie

Over the years, many other events have taken place in Tuileries-Garden. The Tuileries Palace was destroyed by fire during the Paris Commune in 1871, in 1883, the ruins of the Tuileries Palace are razed, during the 1878 World's Fair, Henri Giffard had thousands of people fly in a giant tethered balloon, during the First World War, 2 shell launched by the German cannon Grosse Bertha exploded in the Jardin-des-Tuileries and near the Orangery terrace, during the Second World War, a part of the Tuileries Gardens was transformed into a vegetable garden, on August 25, 1944, german General von Choltitz, commander of the "Groß-Paris" surrender after violent fighting. Captain Branet took the nearby Hotel Meurice, on rue de Rivoli, which was also the headquarters of the German occupation forces.

Eighty sculptures are exposed in the Tuileries-Garden. List and location on "Tuileries-Garden".

Localisation
Open hours

Access to the Jardin des Tuileries

  • Free access
  • Opening hours: From the last Sunday of September to the last Saturday of March: every day, from 7:30 am to 7:30 pm.
  • From the last Sunday of March to the last Saturday of September: every day, 7am-9pm. June, July and August: daily, from 7am to 11pm. The evacuation of the public begins 30 minutes before closing time.
  • Nocturne
    Until 11 pm in June, July and August.
Access

Tuileries Garden
Place de la Concorde
75001 Paris

  • Metro - Concorde Station (Lines 1, 8 and 12), Tuileries Station (Line 1)
  • RER - Musée d'Orsay
  • Bus - 21, 27, 42, 68, 69, 72, 73, 84, 94, 95
  • Velib' : stations n°1018, n°1017, n°1019.

Access to the Jardin des Tuileries

  • Free access
  • Opening hours: From the last Sunday of September to the last Saturday of March: every day, from 7:30 am to 7:30 pm.
  • From the last Sunday of March to the last Saturday of September: every day, 7am-9pm. June, July and August: daily, from 7am to 11pm. The evacuation of the public begins 30 minutes before closing time.
  • Nocturne
    Until 11 pm in June, July and August.
Address

Jardin des Tuileries
Place de la Concorde
75001 Paris
Tel. +33 (0) 1 40 20 53 17
https://www.louvre.fr

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ', ") 48° 51′ 44″ N 2° 19' 52″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86413 2.32831

 

 

Reservation

Tuileries Festival - Free admission. Paid attractions

  • Opening hours and prices
  • Open from July 3 to August 30, 2020 from 11am to 11:45pm. From 11:00 am to 12:45 am on Fridays, Saturdays and the day before public holidays.

Gardens, Jardin aux Tuileries exhibition - paying admission - from June 8, 2022 to June 12, 2022

Welcoming each year more than 20 000 visitors, the event Jardins, jardin aux Tuileries has become a must at the beginning of June. Located in the Tuileries Gardens, a stone's throw from the Louvre and the Place de la Concorde, the show presents a dozen gardens and twenty terraces and balconies staged by professionals. Visitors can find some inspiration for the design of their exteriors and discuss with the gardeners and landscapers present.

  • Schedule : from 10 am to 7 pm
  • Price : 14€. Reduced : 10 € - Afterwork evening: 7€ (June 5)
  • Free admission: under 18 years old
Description complète

The Tuileries-Garden separates the Carrousel garden and the Louvre museum from the Place de la Concorde. They are a place of walk and culture frequented by Parisians and tourists.

The Tuileries-Garden were "started" in 1564, at the same time as the Tuileries Palace. Originally, they were "à l'italienne" (rectangular compartments with different plantings, tree beds, quincunxes, lawns, flowerbeds, etc.). The patron was Catherine de Medici, also of Italian origin.

The evolution of the Jardin des Tuileries

From 1664, the Tuileries-Garden was entirely redesigned by André Le Nôtre, the famous gardener of King Louis XIV who had already distinguished himself at the Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte for Fouquet. He gave them the current appearance of a French garden. A fountain, a menagerie and a grotto decorated by the famous ceramist Bernard Palissy decorate the garden. In the years 1605-1625, an orangery and a silkworm farm were added.

In 1716, a pedestrian swing bridge was installed to reach the Place Louis XV (today Place de la Concorde), crossing the ditch of the enclosure of Louis XIII. It was demolished in 1817.

It is in 1783 that took place the first ascent of people in a gas balloon. A plaque, located today on the right when entering the garden, marks the memory of this event.

During the Revolution, the Tuileries-Garden was the witness of the great events of which the palace itself was the theater, notably the capture of the Tuileries on August 10, 1792.

The round basin was also used for the ceremony of the Supreme Being on June 8, 1794. Effigies representing Atheism surrounded by Ambition, Selfishness, Discord and False Simplicity were placed there. Maximilien de Robespierre sets fire to it, in an apotheosis of shouts and applause. On October 10 of the same year, this same basin welcomes the coffin of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, draped with a sheet strewn with stars (exhumed from Ermenonville to be taken to the Pantheon).

The rue de Rivoli was laid out at the beginning of the 19th century between the rue de Rohan and the rue Saint-Florentin on the site of the impasse du Manège and the land occupied by the Dames-de-l'Assomption. The Tuileries-Garden was then extended to the northwest. During the development of the Quai des Tuileries, a supporting wall was built along the waterfront terrace, with stones extracted from the Châtillon quarries.   At the western corners of the garden, Napoleon III had two identical buildings built:

  • a jeu de paume to the northwest which now houses a museum of contemporary art and photography, the Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Paume. This room of the Jeu de Paume has nothing to do with the "oath of the Jeu de Paume" of the history of France, which was in the castle of Versailles
  • an orangery in the southwest. Today it houses a museum of modern art, the Musée de l'Orangerie, in which we can see the Water Lilies of Claude Monet, but also works from the collection of Jean Walter and Paul Guillaume. See Listing (Note: open from 9 am to 6 pm, closed on Tuesdays - Tel: 33 (01) 44 77 80 07 or 33 (01) 44 50 43 00).

The history in progress of the Tuileries-Garden

Over the years, many other events have taken place in Tuileries-Garden.

  • The Tuileries Palace was destroyed by fire during the Paris Commune in 1871.
    In 1877, the rue des Tuileries, the current avenue du Général-Lemonnier, was opened on the site of the terrace of the former Tuileries Palace.
  • In 1883, the ruins of the Tuileries Palace are razed, which now makes it very difficult for visitors not aware of the presence of the old palace to understand the lines and aesthetics of the Tuileries garden. The Carrousel garden is laid out in part on the site of the vanished palace (towards the Louvre Palace). As a result, the Jardin-des-Tuileries is now visible from the front of the large courtyard of the Palais du Louvre. The Avenue du Général Lemonnier having been partially buried, the two gardens are in continuity with each other.
  • On the occasion of the 1878 World's Fair, Henri Giffard had thousands of people fly in a giant tethered balloon.
  • On March 23, 1918, during the First World War, a shell launched by the German cannon Grosse Bertha exploded in the Jardin-des-Tuileries. On May 28, 1918 another shell exploded near the Orangery terrace.
  • During the Second World War, a part of the Tuileries Gardens was transformed into a vegetable garden.
  • On August 25, 1944, General von Choltitz, commander of the "Groß-Paris", received an ultimatum to surrender from Colonel Pierre Billotte of the 2nd DB. After violent fighting, Captain Branet took the nearby Hotel Meurice, on rue de Rivoli, which was also the headquarters of the German occupation forces.
  • Captain Julien took the rue du Faubourg-Saint-Honoré, parallel to the Jardins des Tuileries, to reach the Kommandantur headquarters on the Place de l'Opéra, while Lieutenant Bricard cleaned up the Jardins des Tuileries. These were fierce battles and the ten commemorative plaques along the Jardin des Tuileries at the corner of rue de Rivoli and place de la Concorde bear witness to the number of victims.

Nowadays and for several years, a funfair of the Tuileries-Garden takes place between the end of June and the end of August in the Jardin-des-Tuileries. The entrance is free, the attractions are paying (More than 80 fairground attractions including 20 rides). Also a big exhibition on the gardens is held every year at the beginning of June.

The sculptures exposed in the Tuileries-Garden

The Tuileries-Garden, especially in its eastern part, contains a collection of classical works by French sculptors:

  • West entrance, the horseshoe :
    Buste de Le Nôtre (48° 51′ 54″ N, 2° 19′ 22″ E).
    La Loire et le Loiret, Corneille Van Clève (1703-1707 ; 48° 51′ 53″ N, 2° 19′ 24″ E)
    Le Nil, Lorenzo Ottoni (1688-1692 ; 48° 51′ 52″ N, 2° 19′ 24″ E)
    La Seine et la Marne, Nicolas Coustou (1704-1712 ; 48° 51′ 54″ N, 2° 19′ 25″ E).
    Le Tibre, Pierre Bourdict (1685-1690 ; 48° 51′ 54″ N, 2° 19′ 26″ E)
  • East of the Great Octagonal Basin:
    Agrippine, Robert Doisy (1658-1690 ; 48° 51′ 50″ N, 2° 19′ 27″ E).
    Annibal, François Girardon (1722 ; 48° 51′ 52″ N, 2° 19′ 30″ E)
    L'Automne ou Vertumne, François Barois (1696 ; 48° 51′ 51″ N, 2° 19′ 28″ E)
    L'Été, Guillaume Coustou (1726 ; 48° 51′ 53″ N, 2° 19′ 29″ E)
    L'Hiver, Jean Raon (1710-1712 ; 48° 51′ 53″ N, 2° 19′ 29″ E)
    Jules César, Nicolas Coustou (1722 ; 48° 51′ 51″ N, 2° 19′ 29″ E)
    Le Printemps ou Pomone, François Barois (1696 ; 48° 51′ 51″ N, 2° 19′ 27″ E)
    Véturie, Pierre Le Gros le jeune (1695 ; 48° 51′ 54″ N, 2° 19′ 29″ E).
  • Jeu-de-Paume Terrace:
    Lion, Giuseppe Franchi (48° 51′ 58″ N, 2° 19′ 24″ E).
  • Terrace of the Orangery:
    Le Baiser, Auguste Rodin (1886-1898 ; 48° 51′ 50″ N, 2° 19′ 18″ E).
    Ève, Auguste Rodin (1881 ; 48° 51′ 50″ N, 2° 19′ 22″ E)
    La Grande Ombre, Auguste Rodin (1880 ; 48° 51′ 50″ N, 2° 19′ 22″ E)
    Lion, Giuseppe Franchi (1806 ; 48° 51′ 50″ N, 2° 19′ 18″ E)
    Méditation, Auguste Rodin (1881 ; 48° 51′ 50″ N, 2° 19′ 22″ E)
  • Feuillants' terrace :
    Lion et lionne se disputant un sanglier, Auguste Cain (1882 ; 48° 51′ 54″ N, 2° 19′ 38″ E).
    Monument à Jules Ferry, Gustave Michel (1906-1910 ; 48° 51′ 49″ N, 2° 19′ 52″ E).
    Monument à Waldeck-Rousseau, Laurent Marqueste (1909 ; 48° 51′ 56″ N, 2° 19′ 30″ E).
    Retour de chasse, Antonin Carlès (1888 ; 48° 51′ 49″ N, 2° 19′ 53″ E).
    Rhinocéros attaqué par des tigres, Auguste Cain (1882-1884 ; 48° 51′ 55″ N, 2° 19′ 37″ E).
  • Waterfront Terrace :
    Les Fils de Caïn, Paul Landowski (1906, terrasse du Bord-de-l'Eau ; statue ; 48° 51′ 41″ N, 2° 19′ 45″ E).
    Lion au serpent, Antoine-Louis Barye (1832 ; 48° 51′ 48″ N, 2° 19′ 24″ E).
  • Grand Couvert :
    Apollon, Paul Belmondo (48° 51′ 54″ N, 2° 19′ 31″ E).
    Jeannette, Paul Belmondo (48° 51′ 54″ N, 2° 19′ 31″ E)
    Monument à Charles Perrault, Gabriel Pech (1908 ; 48° 51′ 54″ N, 2° 19′ 33″ E).
  • North Exedra:
    Atalante, Pierre Lepautre (1703-1705 ; 48° 51′ 49″ N, 2° 19′ 41″ E).
    Faune au chevreau, Pierre Lepautre (1685 ; 48° 51′ 50″ N, 2° 19′ 40″ E).
    Hippomène, Guillaume Coustou (1712 ; 48° 51′ 49″ N, 2° 19′ 41″ E).
  • South Exedra:
    Apollon poursuivant Daphné, Nicolas Coustou (1714 ; 48° 51′ 47″ N, 2° 19′ 40″ E).
    Daphné poursuivie par Apollon, Nicolas Coustou (1714 ; 48° 51′ 47″ N, 2° 19′ 39″ E).
    Vénus callipyge, François Barois et Jean Thierry (1683-1686 ; 48° 51′ 47″ N, 2° 19′ 38″ E).
  • Grand Carré :
    Diane à la biche, Guillaume Coustou (48° 51′ 51″ N, 2° 19′ 44″ E).
    Diane chasseresse, Edmond Lévêque (1869 ; 48° 51′ 45″ N, 2° 19′ 49″ E).
    Flore Farnèse, Antoine André (1676 ; 48° 51′ 44″ N, 2° 19′ 39″ E)
    Hercule Farnèse, Giovanni Comino (1670 ; 48° 51′ 47″ N, 2° 19′ 42″ E)
    Jules César, Ambrogio Parisi (1694 ou 1713 ? ; 48° 51′ 48″ N, 2° 19′ 42″ E)
    La Mort de Laïs, Mathieu-Meusnier (1850 ; 48° 51′ 43″ N, 2° 19′ 44″ E)
    Nymphe, Edmond Lévêque (1866 ; 48° 51′ 45″ N, 2° 19′ 50″ E)
    Tigre terrassant un crocodile, Auguste Cain (1869-1873 ; 48° 51′ 47″ N, 2° 19′ 51″ E).
    Tigresse apportant un paon à ses petits, Auguste Cain (1873 ; 48° 51′ 43″ N, 2° 19′ 48″ E).
  • Large round basin:
    Alexandre combattant, Charles-François Lebœuf (1836 ; 48° 51′ 45″ N, 2° 19′ 44″ E).
    Le Bon Samaritain, François Sicard (1896 ; 48° 51′ 45″ N, 2° 19′ 45″ E).
    Caïn venant de tuer son frère Abel, Henri Vidal (1896 ; 48° 51′ 46″ N, 2° 19′ 48″ E).
    Cassandre se met sous la protection de Pallas, Aimé Millet (1877 ; 48° 51′ 47″ N, 2° 19′ 48″ E).
    Le Centaure Nessus enlevant Déjanire, Laurent Marqueste (1892 ; 48° 51′ 48″ N, 2° 19′ 46″ E).
    Cincinnatus, Denis Foyatier (1834 ; 48° 51′ 46″ N, 2° 19′ 43″ E)
    La Comédie, Jules Toussaint Roux (1874 ; 48° 51′ 48″ N, 2° 19′ 45″ E)
    Médée, Paul Gasq (1896 ; 48° 51′ 46″ N, 2° 19′ 43″ E)
    La Misère, Jean-Baptiste Hugues (1905-1907 ; 48° 51′ 45″ N, 2° 19′ 47″ E).
    Périclés distribuant des couronnes aux artistes, Jean-Baptiste Joseph Debay (1835 ; 48° 51′ 45″ N, 2° 19′ 46″ E).
    Le Serment de Spartacus, Louis-Ernest Barrias (1869 ; 48° 51′ 48″ N, 2° 19′ 44″ E).
    Thésée combattant le Minotaure, Jules Ramey (1821 ; 48° 51′ 48″ N, 2° 19′ 47″ E).
    À l'angle de l'avenue du Général-Lemonnier et du quai Aimé-Césaire se trouve une statue de sphinge, dite " Sphinge de Sébastopol " (cf. ces deux articles pour son histoire).

The western part of the Tuileries-Garden, closest to the Place de la Concorde, contains a group of contemporary works, mainly installed in the year 2000 under the direction of Alain Kirili1 :

    • L'Ami de personne, Erik Dietman (1992 ; 48° 51′ 51″ N, 2° 19′ 40″ E).
      Arbre des voyelles, Giuseppe Penone (1999 ; 48° 51′ 47″ N, 2° 19′ 34″ E).
      Arcs de cercles complémentaires, François Morellet (2000, Jardin des Tuileries ; installation murale ; 48° 51′ 54″ N, 2° 19′ 22″ E).
      Le Bel costumé, Jean Dubuffet (1973/1998 ; 48° 51′ 56″ N, 2° 19′ 25″ E)
      Comptine, Anne Rochette (1999, groupe sculpté ; 48° 51′ 48″ N, 2° 19′ 31″ E)
      Confidence, Daniel Dezeuze (2000, Jardin des Tuileries ; installation ; 48° 51′ 47″ N, 2° 19′ 39″ E)
      Coup de chapeau II, Roy Lichtenstein (1996 ; 48° 51′ 51″ N, 2° 19′ 42″ E)
      L'Échiquier, grand, Germaine Richier (1959, groupe sculpté ; 48° 51′ 48″ N, 2° 19′ 35″ E)
      Force et Tendresse, Eugène Dodeigne (1996 ; 48° 51′ 51″ N, 2° 19′ 42″ E)
      La Foule, Raymond Mason (1963-1967, groupe sculpté ; 48° 51′ 55″ N, 2° 19′ 29″ E)
      Galatea, Roy Lichtenstein (1990 ; 48° 51′ 51″ N, 2° 19′ 42″ E)
      Grand Commandement blanc, Alain Kirili (1986, groupe sculpté ; 48° 51′ 51″ N, 2° 19′ 21″ E)
      Grande Femme II, Alberto Giacometti (1959-60 ; 48° 51′ 50″ N, 2° 19′ 29″ E)
      La Grande Musicienne, Henri Laurens (1937 ; 48° 51′ 50″ N, 2° 19′ 29″ E)
      Manus Ultimus, Magdalena Abakanowicz (1997 ; 48° 51′ 49″ N, 2° 19′ 40″ E)
      Microbe vu à travers un tempérament, Max Ernst (1964 ; 48° 51′ 50″ N, 2° 19′ 29″ E).
      Personnage III, Étienne Martin (1967, groupe sculpté ; 48° 51′ 52″ N, 2° 19′ 31″ E).
      (Placé) sur un point fixe (Pris) depuis un point fixe. n° 717, Lawrence Weiner (2000, Jardin des Tuileries ; installation murale ; 48° 51′ 55″ N, 2° 19′ 30″ E).
      Primo Piano II, David Smith (1962 ; 48° 51′ 50″ N, 2° 19′ 29″ E)
      Figure couchée, Henry Moore (1951 ; 48° 51′ 50″ N, 2° 19′ 25″ E)
      Femme debout, Gaston Lachaise (1932 ; 48° 51′ 49″ N, 2° 19′ 40″ E)
      Les Mains accueillantes, Louise Bourgeois (1996, groupe sculpté ; 48° 51′ 55″ N, 2° 19′ 22″ E).

Note: Works from the Tuileries-Garden moved to other locations:

  • Brushstroke Nude, Roy Lichtenstein (1993).
  • Le Cri, Chaim Jacob Lipchitz (1928-1929)
  • Sans titre, Ellsworth Kelly (1988)

And to refresh yourself at the Tuileries-Garden ?

6 restaurants or cafés are located in the Jardin-des-Tuileries :

  • Rosa Bonheur la Crêperie - on the edge of the Place de la Concorde
  • Petit Farmers - near the Grand Bassin - about in the center of the Tuileries
  • Café des Marronniers (open Monday to Sunday from 7am to 9pm) - near the Grand Bassin
  • Petit Plisson des Tuileries - about in the center of the Tuileries
  • Terrasse de Pomone - about in the center of the Tuileries
  • Le Pavillon des Tuileries (Lunch 10:30am-5pm and Dinner 5pm-7pm) - near the Grand Bassin La Terrasse de Pomone (open all year round according to the opening hours of the Jardin des Tuileries) - about in the center of the Tuileries
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  • July 12, 2024 9:51 am local time

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