Walk from Pompidou-museum to the Bastille via the Marais

Promenade-musee-pompidou-a-bastille-par-marais

The Walk from Pompidou-museum to Bastille Square is located in Le Marais District, slightly east of the geographic center of Paris. It is also just north of the Seine river (called “Rive droite” or “right bank”). The points of interest described are on both sides of the itinerary.

Walk from Pompidou-museum: a walk through time

This Walk from Pompidou-museum in the Marais to Bastille Square starts on the “parvis” in front of the Pompidou Museum and ends at the Bastille Square, at the foot of the Bastille Column. It includes 17 points of interest to see along the way, directly from the street where you are. It is about 1500 m long. (1 mile) and can easily be done in 2 hours.

Quartier du Marais: special for its history and the communities that have settled here

The “Parvis” in front of the Pompidou Museum is the ideal starting point for a walk in the Marais, one of the most charming historical districts of the capital, for the heritage treasures it shelters and the atmosphere it gives off.

The many private mansions of the 17th and 18th centuries have been transformed into internationally renowned museums: Picasso Paris Museum, Carnavalet MuseumVictor Hugo’s house and a few more.

Rue des Rosiers, the epicenter of the Parisian Jewish community, is worth discovering for its atmosphere, its stores and its restaurants. And also there are countless bars, shops and clubs that make the Marais the largest gay district in France.

The icing on the cake: Relaxation breaks along your Walk from Pompidou-museum to avoid fatigue

We’ve added “Relaxation Breaks” to the “Points of Interest” on our walks and the information you’ll find for each. These “Relaxation Breaks” are distributed along the route (coffee break, restaurant break, shopping break). This will allow you to rest, taste or buy at recommended points rated (up to 5) by the tourists who have preceded you. Avoid scores below 4.0.

In the “Promenade du Musée-Pompidou à la Bastille par le Marais“, we’ve listed ? “Relaxation Breaks” to choose from: 10 restaurants, 4 bakeries/pastry shops/ice cream shops, 1 art gallery, 1 perfumery, 1 supermarket, 1 pharmacy, 1 souvenir and gift store. They are recalled in the Points of Interest list at the exact location on the itinerary where they are found, in paragraph “To continue your walk “.

In addition, all these stops are listed, rated to avoid unpleasant surprises, and located on the special route map that you will get by. Click on Relaxation breaks on the way to the Sacré-Cœur by Montmartre-sud.

Musée Pompidou
Place Georges-Pompidou
75004 Paris
Tel: +33 (0)1 44 78 12 33, Monday to Saturday from 9am to 7pm, excluding public holidays

Tel : +33 (0)1 44 78 12 33, du lundi au samedi de 9h à 19h, hors jours fériés

Architects : Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 38″ N 2° 21′ 09″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86069 2.35156

Access

  • Métro :
    • Station Rambuteau –  line  Métro ligne 11
    • Station Hôtel de Ville – lines Métro ligne 1 Métro ligne 11
    • Station Châtelet – lines Métro ligne 1 Métro ligne 4 Métro ligne 7 Métro ligne 11 Métro ligne 14
  • RER : Station Châtelet Les Halles – lines RER A, Paris - picto RER B, Paris - picto RER D, Paris - picto
  • Bus  Lines : Bus ligne 29 Bus ligne 38 Bus ligne 47 Bus ligne 75
    • Vélib :
      • station n°4020, opposite 27, rue Quincampoix
      • station n°3014, opposite 34, rue Grenier Saint-Lazare
      • station n°3010, 46, rue Beaubourg
    • Parking Centre Pompidou : access at 31, rue Beaubourg
  • Book your parking space at negotiated rates without reservation fees thanks to ParkingsdeParis.com, partner of the Centre Pompidou.

Short description

The Centre Pompidou, designed by architects Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers, is a marvel of 20th century architecture, recognizable by its exterior escalators and enormous colored pipes.
  • It houses the National Museum of Modern Art, a world reference for its collections of 20th and 21st century art.
  • The works of major artists are divided chronologically into two areas: the modern period from 1905 to 1960 (Matisse, Picasso, Dubuffet …) and the contemporary period from 1960 to today (Andy Warhol, Niki de Saint Phalle, Anish Kapoor …).
  • In addition to these permanent collections, internationally renowned exhibitions are organized all year round on the top floor, from where the panoramic view of the center of Paris and its rooftops is unobstructed.
  • You can spend half a day or even the whole day there: you can eat at the Georges (Resrtaurant), learn at the Public Information Library and browse in the store.
  • At the foot of the Center, in the Piazza, the Brancusi workshop presents a unique collection of works by this major artist in the history of modern sculpture.

For more detail information click on Pompidou Museum in anglais or/ou le Musée Pompidou en français.

  • Open/close/entrance fees
  • Pompidou Museum: what for ?
  • The National Museum of Modern Art
  • Avant-garde building, construction and controversy
  • The Pompidou Center, in the center of Paris
  • The project, the past and the future of the Pompidou Museum
  • The dimensions of the Centre Pompidou
  • Center Pompidou and the spaces to discover
  • The Centre Pompidou: a multidisciplinary museum
  • The Pompidou Museum dedicated to the 20th and 21st century
  • The Centre Pompidou: an interactive map to avoid getting lost!

On leaving the Musée Pompidou, head north from Place Georges Pompidou (on your right) to rue Rambuteau and turn right. After approx. 200 m, take rue du Temple. Your next Point of Interest is 20 m away.

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Musée d’Arts et d’Histoire du Judaïsme (mahj)
71, rue du Temple
75003 Paris

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 40″ N 2° 21′ 19″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.86096 2.35567

Access

  • Métro :
    • Station Rambuteau –  line  Métro ligne 11
    • Station Hôtel de Ville – lines Métro ligne 1 Métro ligne 11
    • Station Châtelet – lines Métro ligne 1 Métro ligne 4 Métro ligne 7 Métro ligne 11 Métro ligne 14
  • RER : Station Châtelet Les Halles – lines RER A, Paris - picto RER B, Paris - picto RER D, Paris - picto
  • Bus  Lines : Bus ligne 29 Bus ligne 38 Bus ligne 47 Bus ligne 75
    • Vélib :
      • station n°4020, opposite 27, rue Quincampoix
      • station n°3014, opposite 34, rue Grenier Saint-Lazare
      • station n°3010, 46, rue Beaubourg
    • Parking Centre Pompidou : access at 31, rue Beaubourg
  • Book your parking space at negotiated rates without reservation fees thanks to ParkingsdeParis.com, partner of the Centre Pompidou.

Short description

The Musée d’Art et d’Histoire du Judaïsme (mahJ) is a French museum located in the Marais district of Paris, housed in the former Hôtel particulier de Saint-Aignan.

With the third-largest Jewish community in the world, France has a Jewish history stretching back over 2,000 years, particularly in the Marais, where Jews have lived since the Middle Ages. The mahJ presents one of the finest collections of Jewish religious objects and works of art, bearing witness to the history of the Jews of France, Europe and North Africa.

The permanent collection is organized around chronological, geographical and thematic themes, highlighting the diversity and unity of Jewish communities. In addition to temporary exhibitions, the museum offers cultural events and educational activities. It also has a media library and bookshop, as well as an auditorium.

The building, the Hôtel de Saint-Aignan, has a rich history, having been restored and dedicated to the museum in 1998, under the initiative of Jacques Chirac, then Mayor of Paris.

 

For more details click on Museum of Jewish Art and History en anglais or/ou le Musée d’Art et d’Histoire du Judaïsme en français:

  • Opening hours and closing periods
  • Rates and conditions – Reservation
  • The Museum of Jewish Art and History, the Marais and the Jews
  • The permanent collection of the Museum of Jewish Art and History
  • The presentation is divided into
  • The Dreyfus Fund at the Museum of Jewish Art and History
  • Acquisitions related to the Dreyfus Affair
  • The Museum, the Marais and the Hôtel de Saint-Aignan

Retrace your steps and continue along rue du Temple for 200 m. Your next Point of Interest awaits you at 41 .

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Café de la Gare – Theater
41 rue du Temple
75004 Paris

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 39″ N 2° 19′ 49″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.85955 2.35402

Access

  • Café de la Gare
    41 rue du Temple
    75004 Paris

    •  Metro: Hôtel de Ville station (lines 1 or 11) exit 7 or Rambuteau station (line 11) exit 3
    • RER: Châtelet-les-Halles station (lines A, B, D)
    • Bus: Georges Pompidou stop, lines 38, 47 and 75 (opposite rue Pierre-au-Lard) – Georges Pompidou stop, line 29 (at the intersection with rue Rambuteau) – Hôtel de Ville stop, lines 76 and 96 (rue de Rivoli)
    • Parking: Parking Georges Pompidou (very expensive, very beautiful) – Parking Beaubourg (less expensive, less beautiful.

Short description

The Café-de-la-Gare Theater, located in the heart of the Marais district at 41 rue du Temple, in the 4th arrondissement of Paris. It has been one of the temples of Parisian laughter since 1969. Coluche, Gérard Depardieu and Benoît Pœlvoorde, all confirmed actors, have walked the stage of this unique 300-seat theater.

For more information click on Café de la Gare theater in anglais or/ou Café de la Gare en français:

  • Opening hours and closing periods
  • Rates and conditions – Reservation
  • The beginnings: the collective Café-de-la-Gare Théâtre
  • Moving the Café-de-la-Gare Theater to Le Marais

Opposite, take rue du Plâtre, perpendicular to rue du Temple, then left on rue des Archives. After 100 m, you’ll reach your destination at 60 Rue des Francs Bourgeois.

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Musée des Archives nationales – Hôtel de Soubise
60 rue des Francs-Bourgeois
75003 Paris 3ème
Tel: +33 1 40 27 60 96

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 35″ N 2° 21′ 35″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.85997 2.35713

Access

Musée des Archives-Nationales – Hôtel de Soubise
60 Rue des Francs Bourgeois
75004 Paris 4
Tel: +33 1 40 27 64 19

  • Metro: Hôtel de Ville (lines 1 and 11), Rambuteau (line 11), Arts et Métiers (line 3), Saint-Paul, Châtelet-les Halles stations
  • RER: Chatelet-Les Halles station (lines A, B and D) and St Michel-Notre Dame station (line C)
  • Bus: 29, 58, 67, 69, 70, 72, 74, 75, 76, 96.

Short description

The Archives-Nationales museum, created in 1867 under Napoleon III, exhibits to the public the archival documents conserved by the “Archives-Nationales” institution.

The Archives-Nationales holds 373 linear km of archives documenting the history of France from the 7th century to the present day.

The Archives-Nationales (Paris site) and the Museum The Archives-Nationales are housed in the Hôtel de Soubise and the Hôtel de Rohan, two of the finest hotels in the Marais district.

The Museum exhibits regularly updated archive documents and temporary thematic exhibitions.

The exhibition rooms are also exceptional interiors that can only be viewed on guided tours at the same time as the decorations of the Chancellerie d’Orléans reassembled in the Hôtel de Rohan.

For more information click on “National-Archives-Museum” available en Français and in English  – in particular:

  • Opening hours and closing periods
  • Rates and conditions – Booking
  • Full description of the Museum

Continue along Rue des Francs-Bourgeois. On the left, you’ll pass the Hôtel de Breteuil, 20 m further on the Hôtel de Fontenay, then the Hôtel de Jaucourt in the gardens of the Archives Nationales. Turn left into rue Veille-du Temple, then right into rue de la Perle, then left into rue de Thorigny. Your next stop is 75 m away.

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Picasso Museum (Musée national Picasso-Paris)
5 rue de Thorigny
Paris, 75003, France

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 35″ N  2° 21′ 45″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.85982 2.36234

 

Access

  • Metro – Line 1 (Saint-Paul Station) – Line 8 (Saint-Sébastien Froissart Station) – Line 8 (Chemin Vert Station)
  • RER – Châtelet – Les Halles
  • Bus – 20, 29, 67, 69, 72, 75, 76, 96
  • Parking : 132 rue du Temple – 7 rue Barbette – 31 rue Beaubourg – 16 rue St Antoine – 5 rue Pernelle – 4 rue de Lobau – 4 place Baudoyer

Short description

The Picasso-Museum is the main French national museum dedicated to the life and work of Pablo Picasso and the artists who were linked to him.

The inventory of the Picasso-Museum’s online collection made in 2015, included 4,609 works out of a total of 4,949, of which 4,862 were by Picasso. There were also 17,623 photographs, 384 films, 11,000 books, 89 of them illustrated by Picasso, and 200,000 archival items.

Of the 297 paintings, 254 were by Picasso and 43 from his private collection of master paintings: 8 Matisse, 7 Renoir, 4 Le Douanier Rousseau, 3 Cézanne, 3 Corot, 2 Braque, 2 Derain, 2 Miró, 1 Courbet, Gauguin, Vuillard, Marie Laurencin, Modigliani, Van Dongen, Ernst, Balthus, Ortiz de Zárate, Chardin, Le Nain, and  Maître du Cortège du Bélier

Picasso was an artist who practiced his art in many fields. The same was true of the objects he collected throughout his life: Ceramics, Engravings, Paintings, Photography, Sculpture.

Also the history of the Hôtel Salé which became the Picasso Museum

For more information click on Picasso Museum en anglais or/ou Musée Picasso en français :

  • Opening hours and closing periods
  • Rates and conditions – Reservation
  • The immense Picasso-Museum collection
  • The diversity of Picasso’s works and collections
  • Retrospective of the life of Pablo Picasso
  • Map of the Picasso-Museum
  • The origin of the collections of the Picasso-Museum: mainly donations from the heirs
  • How the Hôtel Salé became the Picasso Museum
  • The first owner of the Hôtel Salé: Pierre Aubert de Fontenay
  • Architecture of the moment of construction known as “mazarine”
  • How the Hôtel Salé became the Picasso-Museum
  • Pierre Aubert’s successors
  • The last period of major renovation and expansion of the Picasso-Museum (September 2011 – October 2014)

On leaving the Picasso Museum, retrace your steps along rue de Thorigny and, after the bend in the road, turn right into rue Elzevir. The next Point of Interest is 100 m ahead on the left.

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Musée Cognacq-Jay
8 rue Elzévir
75003 Paris
Tél : 01 40 27 07 21

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 29,5″ N 2° 21′ 41″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.85817 2.36139

Access

Musée Cognacq-Jay
8 rue Elzévir
75003 Paris

  • Metro: Saint-Paul (line 1), Chemin-Vert (line 8), Rambuteau (line 11)
  • Bus: routes 29 (Turenne-Saint Gilles / Payenne), 69 (Saint-Paul), 76 (Saint-Paul), 96 (Saint-Paul)
  • Vélib’: station n°4013 Vieille du Temple – Francs Bourgeois, station 3002 Saint Gilles – Turenne

Short description

The Musée Cognacq-Jay is housed in the Hôtel de Donon at 8, rue Elzévir, in the 3rd arrondissement of Paris’s Marais district. It is the museum of collectors Ernest Cognacq and his wife.

The Musée Cognacq-Jay brings together the 1,200 18th-century European works acquired between 1900 and 1927 by Ernest Cognacq, founder of the Samaritaine department stores, and his wife Marie-Louise Jay. It also recreates the atmosphere of a Parisian residence in the Age of Enlightenment, with its interior staircases, the Salle Wagram, Salon with François Boucher’s Le Retour de Diane chasseresse, and the exhibition room under the great roof.

For more information click on “Musée Cognacq-Jay” available en Français and in English  – in particular:

  • Opening hours and closing periods
  • Rates and conditions – Booking
  • Full description

Continue 50 m along rue Elzevir to rue des Francs-Bourgeois. Turn right.

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Rue Des Francs Bourgeois
75003 et 75004 Paris

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 29″ N 2° 21′ 36″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.85793 2.36025

Access

  • Metro – Line 1 (Saint-Paul, Bastille or Hôtel de Ville stations) – Line 7 (Pont Marie and Sully-Morland) – Line 8 (Chemin Vert and Bastille) – Line 5 (Bastille) – Line 11 (Hôtel de Ville station)
  • Bus : Lines 29-72-76-86-87-91

Short description

Rue des Francs-Bourgeois features the private mansions at nos. 31 bis to 29, 30 and 26. The chapel at the end of the garden at no. 29 is a former tower of Philippe Auguste’s enceinte, the rue des Francs-Bourgeois having replaced the old road outside this enceinte.

For more information click on Francs Bourgeois street in english or/ou Rue des Francs Bourgeois en français:

  • The Francs-Bourgeois Street in the heart of the Marais district
  • Where does the original name of the street come from
  • Remarkable buildings of Francs-Bourgeois Street

Continue along this street until you reach rue Veille-du-Temple, which you turn left into. Rue Sainte-Croix de la Bretonnerie is 150 m further on.

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Rue Sainte-Croix De La Bretonnerie
75004 Paris, France

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 30″ N 2° 21′ 20″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.85838 2.35562

Access

  • Metro: line 1 (Stations Hôtel-de-ville and Saint Paul) – line 11 (Station Rambuteau)
  • RER: line A (Station Châtelet-Les Halles)
  • Bus: 29, 38, 69, 72, 74
  •  Velib:
    • Station Vélib’ 4014 (Blancs-Manteaux – Archives)
    • Station Vélib’ 4018 (Saint-Bon – Rivoli)
    • Station Vélib’ 4013 (Vieille du Temple – Francs Bourgeois)

Short description

Busy street of specialized stores and cafes for the gay community of the Marais. The first multicolored flags that marked the new territory in the mid-1990s have disappeared, as if their presence had become obvious enough. Instead, the flags are displayed on the margins, for example on rue des Lombards.
One of the stores to visit: concept store, gifts, a profusion of offbeat and colorful objects to awaken your interiorFleux stores at 39, 40, 43 and 52 rue Sainte-Croix de la Bretonnerie, 75004 Paris.

For more details click on Sainte-croix-de-la-bretonnerie-street or/ou Rue-Sainte-croix-de-la-bretonnerie:

  • Origin of the Sainte-Croix-de-la-Bretonnerie street
  • The rest of the story of the Sainte-Croix-de-la-Bretonnerie street
  • Remarkable buildings and places of memory

Continue along rue Sainte-Croix De La Bretonnerie to reach the Pierre Hermé store 100 m away.

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Pierre Hermé – Macarons et chocolats
18 Rue Sainte-Croix de la Bretonnerie
75004 Paris
tel:+331 43 54 47 77 et 01 43 54 47 77

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 29″ N 2° 21′ 23″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.85817 2.35644

Pierre Hermé also has a Café a few 200 m from this store at 4 rue de Bretagne, 75003 Paris
Open/Close:
For more information click on Pierre-Herme-boutique in english or/ou Boutique Pierre Hermé en français.
Access
Pierre Hermé – Macaroons and chocolates
18 Rue Sainte-Croix de la Bretonnerie
75004 Paris

  • Metro : Hôtel de Ville Station (lines 1 – 9 and 11) – Saint Paul Station (Line 1) – Chemin Vert Station (Station 8)
  • Bus
  • Velib
  • Parking : click here

For more information click on Pierre-Herme-boutique in english or/ou Boutique Pierre Hermé en français:

  • Opening hours and closing periods
  • Pierre Hermé’s specialty
  • The pleasure of the macaroon
  • The history of Pierre Hermé
  • Inspiration and Pierre Hermé
  • High-end pastry at Pierre Hermé boutique
  • Pierre Hermé boutiques in Paris

Retrace your steps. After 30 m on Rue Bourg-Tibourg, if you’d like a prestige tea, turn right.

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Mariage Frères – Le Marais
30-32 et 35 rue du Bourg-Tibourg
75004 Paris
Tel. +33 (0) 1 42 72 28 11

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 28″ N 2° 21′ 23″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.85771 2.35651

Open/Close:
Open Monday to Sunday from 10:30 to 19:30
Restaurant & Salon de Thé

  • Réservations (de 12h à 13h30, pour le déjeuner et le brunch)
  • reservations@mariagefreres.com

Access

  • Metro – Saint-Paul (Line 1) – Hotel-de-Ville (Line 1) – Pont-Marie (Line 14)
  • RER – Saint-Michel – Notre-Dame (Line C)
  • Bus – Lines 67, 69, 75, 76, 96

For more details click on Mariage-freres-tea-store (in english)or/ou Magasin Mariage-Frères  (en français):

  • Opening hours and closing periods
  • Reservation
  • Mariage-Frères du Marais Tea Shop
  • Gastronomy at the Mariage-Frères tea store
  • The Mariage-Frères Tea Museum

Return to rue Sainte-Croix de la Bretonnerie, then turn left into rue Veille-du-Temple and after 20 m into rue des Rosiers.

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Rue des Rosiers
75004 – Paris

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 25″ N 2° 21′ 35″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.85710 2.35963

Access

  • Metro: line 1 (Station Saint Paul) – line 7 (Station Pont Marie) – line 11 (Station Rambuteau)
  • Bus: lines 69, 72, 96, 29, 76, N11, N16, 67
  • Vélib
    • Station Vélib’ 4014 (Blancs-Manteaux – Archives)
    • Station Vélib’ 4013 (Vieille du Temple – Francs Bourgeois)
    • Station Vélib’ 11027 (Saint-Ambroise – Parmentier)

Short description

Rue des Rosiers is at the heart of the Jewish Quarter. It has also become a traditional stop for falafel (a small fritter made from chickpea and bean flour).
Indeed, the most important place in Paris for Judaism is located in the Marais. It’s called the Pletzl (Little Square in Yiddish). The 4th arrondissement (Métro St Paul) has welcomed Jews from near and far since the 13th century. Even today, despite the district’s gentrification, it retains a strong community identity. On rue des Rosiers, rue Malher and rue des Hospitalières-St-Gervais, you’ll find numerous restaurants, bookshops, kosher delicatessens, synagogues and shtiebels (small oratories).
On August 9, 1982, 15 rue des Rosiers was the scene of a horrific event. Jo Goldenberg’s Jewish restaurant at this address was bombed by members of Abu Nidal’s Fatah-Revolutionary Council (FCR), a Palestinian terrorist organization violently opposed to the PLO and Fatah. Six people were killed and 22 wounded. Bullet marks only disappeared from the window in 2010, when the restaurant was replaced by a clothing store, which has since closed. The plaque in memory of the victims having disappeared, a new one was installed by Paris City Hall in 2011. The façade has been listed as a historic monument.

For more information click on Rue-des-rosiers-street – in english or/ou Rue-des-rosiers  en français:

  • The strong historical Jewish presence in the Marais of Paris
  • The Pletzl or “little square”, in Yiddish
  • Rue-des-Rosiers street and the evolution of the neighborhood
  • Remarkable buildings and places of memory of the Rue-des-Rosiers street
  • The attack on Rue-des-Rosiers street on August 9, 1982

Continue along rue des Rosiers and turn left into rue Pavée.

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Rue Pavée
75004 Paris

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 23″ N 2° 21′ 39″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.85651 2.36103

Access

  • Metro: line 1 (Station Saint Paul) – line 7 (Station Pont Marie) – line 11 (Station Rambuteau)
  • Bus: : 29, 67, 69, 72, 96
  • Vélib
    • Station Vélib’ 4014 (Blancs-Manteaux – Archives)
    • Station Vélib’ 4013 (Vieille du Temple – Francs Bourgeois)
    • Station Vélib’ 11027 (Saint-Ambroise – Parmentier)
  • Parkings :

Short description

At 10 rue Pavée is the Synagogue (architect Hector Guimard, 1913). In the Art Nouveau style, it was built at the time when Ashkenazi Jews who had taken refuge in the neighborhood from Central Europe were settling. It is a perfect example of “the transition between the modern style and the style of the 1920s: the harmony is total between the rigor of a reinforced concrete construction, the simplicity of the ornamentation, the elegance of the curves and counter-curves of the façade” (B. Oudin).

For more information click on Pavee-street-in-le-marais in english or/ou Rue Pavee du Marais  en français

  • Remarkable buildings and places of memory of the Pavée-street in the Marais

Your next Point of Interest is at no. 24.

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Bibliothèque historique de la Ville de Paris – BHVP
Hôtel de Lamoignon
24 rue Pavée – 75004 Paris
Tel. +33 (0) 1 44 59 29 40

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 52′ 26″ N 2° 17′ 42″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.85702 2.36161

Access

  • Métro : lines 1 (Station Saint Paul)
  • RER : line A (Station Charles de Gaulle)
  • Bus : 29, (arrêt Payenne) et lines 69, 76, 96, (arrêt Saint-Paul)
  • Vélib :
    • Station 3013, 36 rue de Sévigne
    • Station 4010 :105 rue de Sévigné
    • Station 3002 : 26 rue saint gilles.
  • Parkings :

Short description

The Bibliothèque historique de la ville de Paris (BHVP) is a public library specializing in the history of Paris and the Île-de-France region. Part of the network of municipal libraries of the city of Paris, it has been located since 1969 in the Hôtel d’Angoulême or Lamoignon, at 24 rue Pavée, in the 4th arrondissement.
Its collections deal with the history of Paris and the Île-de-France region in all its aspects: topographical and monumental history, urban, political, religious, social and cultural. It also holds important collections concerning theater and literature.
Its mission is to make available to anyone interested in these subjects the documentary resources that it preserves and enriches.
The hotel was built in 1584 for Diane de France, Duchess of Angouleme, legitimate daughter of Henri II, who left the letters D on the main façade overlooking the courtyard. The decoration composed of bows, arrows, quivers and dogs’ heads evokes Diane’s taste for hunting. The facade is of a rather rare composition: the Corinthian pilasters (with foliage) encompass the three floors. The hotel was rented and then bought in 1688 by Chrestien François de Lamoignon de Malesherbes who embellished the garden, which can be seen from the rue des Francs-Bourgeois. In 1718, he created the portal which bears the letters L M. In the decoration, two loves represent the virtues of the owner: one carries a mirror symbol of truth, the other a snake for prudence.
The Hôtel Lamoignon now houses the historical library of the city of Paris. The contemporary extension of 1966 hosts exhibitions.

For more information click on Historic-library-of-paris in english or/ou Bibliotheque-historique-de-la-ville-de-paris-bhvp  en français:

  • Open/Close: Open every day from Monday to Saturday from 10 am to 6 pm
  • The tormented history of the historical library of Paris
  • Hôtel d’Angoulême or de Lamoignon
  • The historic library of Paris today
  • The collections of the historical library of Paris
  • Cultural activities of Historic Library of Paris
  • Funerary statues of Diana and Charles de Valois

Continue along rue Pavée and after a few meters you will come to a crossroads and turn left into rue des Francs-Bourgeois. Rue Sévigné is the 1st on the left and your next stop is 10 m away.

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Hôtel Carnavalet – Musée Carnavalet – Histoire de Paris
23, rue de Sévigné
75003 Paris
Tél : 01 44 59 58 58

Access

  • Métro – Line  – Station Saint-Paul
  • Bus – lines 29, 69, 76, 96

Short description

The Hôtel-Carnavalet Museum is the Parisian municipal museum dedicated to the history of Paris from the city’s origins to the present day. Located in the historic Marais district, the Carnavalet Museum opened in 1880 and occupies two private mansions from the 16th (Hôtel Carnavalet) and 17th centuries (Hôtel Le Peletier de Saint-Fargeau).
Its visitable spaces in the two hotels represent an area of 3,900 m2 or a route of 1.5 km. In addition, there are temporary exhibition spaces (360 m2). 3,800 works and objects are on display in the permanent exhibition area. The total number of objects belonging to the museum is 610,000.

For more detail information click on hotel-carnavalet-museum in english or/ou Musée Hotel Carnavalet  en français:

  • Opening hours and closing periods
  • Rates and conditions – Reservation
  • The Hôtel-Carnavalet Museum: two hotels for one museum
  • The Hôtel Carnavalet Museum after the renovation (2016 to 2021)
  • The museum’s own collections and their presentation
  • The Musée Hôtel-Carnavalet’s own collections include …
  • Distribution of the collections: the sections of the Hôtel-Carnavalet Museum
  • The archaeological crypt of the Ile de la Cité
  • Large exhibitions are also regularly organized
  • The evolution of the Hôtel-Carnavalet Museum

Back on rue des Francs Bourgeois, turn left towards Place des Vosges.

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Place des Vosges
75004 PARIS

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 20.34″ N 2° 21′ 55.77″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.85609 2.36503

Architects : Louis Métezeau, Androuet du Cerceau et Claude Chastillon

Access

  • Metro (Subway): line 8 (Chemin Vert station)
  • RER :
  • Bus : 29, 69, 76, 96, Balabus
  • Parkings : Parking: quite a few nearby

Open/Close: No closing period
Short description

For more information click on Place des Vosges square in english or/ou Place des Vosges en français.
The Place-des-Vosges square is the jewel of the Marais district  in Paris. It is also the oldest square in Paris, just before the Place Dauphine (near the Pont-Neuf – See our “Stroll …”). Started in 1605 (finished in 1612, 2 years after the assassination of Henri IV , on the occasion of the engagement of his son Louis XIII and Anne of Austria), it is the twin sister of the Place Ducale of Charleville-Mézières built in 1606.
It owes its existence to a fatal accident: on June 20, 1559, during a tournament in which he participated to celebrate the marriage of his daughter (Elizabeth) with Philip II of Spain, King Henry II of France was seriously injured by a shard of spear received in the head. He died 20 days later.

For more detail information click on Place des Vosges square in english or/ou Place des Vosges en français:

  • Its origin: a tragic royal accident
  • A false start with a silk thread factory
  • The definitive devolution that leads to its current appearance
  • The Revolution only re-baptized it several times
  • Organization of the Place-des-Vosges square
  • An XXL choir for the Place-des-Vosges square
  • Place-des-Vosges: an address for wealthy people
  • The list of hotels on the odd side of Place-des-Vosges square
  • The list of hotels on the even side of Place-des-Vosges square

Continue the walk by visiting the Maison de Victor Hugo (the Victor-Hugo-House) at the southern corner of Place Victor Hugo.

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Maison de Victor Hugo
Hôtel de Rohan-Guéménée – 6 place des Vosges
75004 Paris
Tel. +33 (0) 1 42 72 10 16

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 17″ N 2° 21′ 58″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.85482 2.36613

Access

  • Metro: Line 1 – Saint Paul or Bastille stations – Line 8 – Chemin Vert station
  • Bus : lines 29, 69, 76, 96

Short description

The Maison de Victor Hugo is the former Hôtel de Rohan-Guémené. Victor Hugo rented the apartment on the second floor for sixteen years, from 1832 to 1848.

It was in the study of this apartment that Victor Hugo wrote several of his major works: Lucretia Borgia, The Burgraves, Ruy Blas, Marie Tudor, The Twilight Songs, The Inner Voices, The Rays and the Shadows, a large part of Les Misérables,

But it was also 16 years of social and political life and a family drama: his daughter Léopoldine married Charles Vacquerie (1817-1843) on 15 February 1843 and died in a boat accident on September 4 of the same year.

Victor Hugo had to go into exile from 1852 to 1870 to avoid going to prison after the coronation of Napoleon III.

He died in 1885 in his apartment on avenue d’Eylau where. It is on June 1, 1885, ten days after his death, that his remains was led directly to the Pantheon.

For more detail information click on Victor-Hugo House in english or/ou Maison de Victor Hugo en français:

  • Entrance to the permanent collections is free (open house)
  • Open/Close/Reservations
  • Victor-Hugo-House at Place des Vosges: 16 prolific years
  • But also 16 years of social and political life and a family drama
  • Exile from 1852 to 1870. Victor Hugo against Napoleon III
  • The presentation of the Victor-Hugo-House: chronologically the journey of the writer
  • The transfer of the remains of Victor Hugo to the Panthéon in Paris

Continue along the promenade, exiting at Place Victor-Hugo and heading west along Place des Vosges. After 50 m, turn left on rue de Birague. After 75 m, turn left on rue Saint Antoine. Place de la Bastille is 200 m away.

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Bastille
Place de la Bastille
75012, Paris

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 11″ N 2° 22′ 09″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.85313 2.36912

Accès

  • Metro: Line 1 – Saint Paul or Bastille stations – Line 8 – Chemin Vert station
  • Bus : lines 29, 69, 76, 96

Short description

Bastille-Day of 1789 was the result of the state of France following the period of major economic and political crisis from 1783 to 1789.

The leaders ignored until the end the evolution of the events in progress. The financial crisis continued to worsen. This led to the convocation of the Estates General for May 1, 1789.

The consequence was a period of unrest that culminated in the storming of the Bastille on July 14 of that year. Everything then followed one another over the years …

For more detail information click “Bastille-Day of 1789” in english or/ou “Prise de la Bastille, comme si vous étiez en 1789” en français :

  • The state of France and of its inhabitants
  • The incomprehension of the leaders of the evolution of the events in progress
  • The convocation of the Estates General for May 1, 1789
  • France is ripe for a deep break with the past regime
  • The Parisian agitation just before Bastille-Day of 1789
  • The second dismissal of Necker on July 11, 1789 was announced on July 12 by the journalist Camille Desmoulins
  • The insurrection smolders everywhere in Paris
  • The defense of Paris and the Bastille in 1789
  • The course of Bastille-Day of 1789 around the Bastille
  • The aftermath of the Bastille-Day of 1789

The rest of the walk consists of admiring what’s in front of you, the column in the center of the Place de la Bastille.

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Colonne de Juillet
Place de la Bastille
75004, Paris

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48° 51′ 11″ N 2° 22′ 09″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.85313 2.36912

Access

  • Métro : line 1, 5 et 8  (Station Bastille)
  • RER :
  • Bus : 20, 29, 65, 69, 76, 86, 87, 91 et Balabus
  • Parking : quite numerous in the vicinity 

Short description

The Bastille Column was erected after the second revolution of 1830, the first being the “Révolution of 1789“.

Charles X (brother of Louis XVI and Louis XVIII) tried to re-establish an authoritarian regime, by curbing the fervor of the liberal deputies with his “Saint-Cloud ordinances” of July 25, 1830. In response, Parisians rose up during battles that lasted only three days known as “the Three Glorious Days” (“lles Trois Glorieuses” – July 27, 28, and 29, 1830). Charles X and the royal family then fled Paris.

The liberal deputies, mostly monarchists, took the popular revolution in hand. They finally opt for a more liberal constitutional monarchy with the help of a change of dynasty. The House of Orleans, the younger branch of the House of Bourbon (Charles X) succeeded the older branch. The Duke of Orleans is proclaimed “King of the French” and no longer “King of France”, under the name of Louis-Philippe 1er.

One year after the July revolution (1830), King Louis-Philippe laid the first stone of the new project on July 27, 1831. The construction lasted from 1835 to 1840.

The Saint-Martin canal flows under the July column. The foundations that support the monument were built straddling the waterway.

On either side of the canal, two crypts unfold in a semicircle. This is where the remains of the seven hundred victims of the revolutions of July 1830 and February 1848 were placed. On July 28, 1840, the French government, therefore, celebrated with great pomp the transfer of the bodies of the 504 revolutionaries of 1830. They had been buried for 10 years near the Louvre, in the “Jardin de l’Infante”. King Louis-Philippe 1er was in turn driven from the throne in February 1848 and fled. This revolution officially left 500 to 600 victims. 196 of them from the 1848 revolution were added in one of the 2 vaults under the Bastille column.

The Colonne of July is made of bronze. It weighs 179,500 kilograms. The metal part consists of a cubic pedestal that supports a 23-meter high shaft, crowned by a composite construction. It takes 240 steps to reach the top. Its height is 51 m.

 

For more information click on Column of la Bastille  (in english) or/ou Colonne de la Bastille (en français):

  • Column of la Bastille and the Révolution of July 1830
  • Construction of the July Column (1835-1840)
  • The foundations of the column and underground parts
  • The “column de Juillet” or column of “Place de la Bastille”
  • Winged genius from the top
  • The inauguration of the Bastille Column in 1840
  • The 3rd Revolution of 1848 and the revolts of June 22 to 26, 1848
  • Under the column, there are two crypts
  • Note: Free access.
    The “3D Timescope terminal” (installed at the corner of boulevard Richard Lenoir) offers a unique experience. It rotates 360°, is adjustable to the user’s height and plunges the spectator into the Bastille square as it was in 1446! Price: 2€.
    More information on www.timescope.co – Email : hello@timescope.co – Phone : +33 (0) 6 80 12 89 26

Continue the walk, towards the east side of Place de la Bastille, where the Opéra de la Bastille is located.

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Opéra Bastille
164 Rue De Lyon
75012 Paris  France

Coordinates Latitude Longitude
Sexagesimal (°, ‘, “) 48°51′ 07″ N 2° 22′ 14″ E
Degré décimal (GPS) 48.85229 2.36981

 

Access

  • Metro – Bastille station – lines 1, 5 and 8
  • RER – Gare de Lyon station – line A
  • Train SNCF – Gare de Lyon
  • Bus – 29, 69, 76, 86, 87, 91

Short description

The Bastille Opéra is a modern opera house located on the Place de la Bastille in Paris. It was designed by Carlos Ott and inaugurated in 1989 on the occasion of the festivities of the bicentenary of the Revolution

With its 2,745 seats, the main hall of the Bastille Opera compares to the Concert Hall of the Sydney Opera (2,679 seats), the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow (1,720) or the Metropolitan Opera in New York (2/3 of its 3,800 seats).

President François Mitterrand decided in 1982, on the proposal of his Minister of Culture Jack Lang, to build a new opera house in Paris, considering the Garnier opera house to be too small and outdated in technical terms. He wanted a “modern and popular” opera.

Tours led by a lecturer take visitors behind the scenes of this modern theater with impressive dimensions. They are suspended during the Covid period.

The Opéra Bastille is a veritable city that comes alive before and during the shows: stage technicians, sculptors and painters, seamstresses and hairdressers, etc., organized by “project”. Each project is in fact a given show, with specific “show objectives”.

For more information click on Bastille Opera (in english) or/ou Opera Bastille (en français):

  • Opening hours and closing periods
  • Reservation – Exchanges, cancellation, ticket exchange – Room plan and rates – Programming and date of 1st ticket on sale
  • Visit of the Opéra Bastille
  • One of the largest opera houses in the world
  • The layout of the building
  • Organization of the stage work – The “opera city”
  • Why the Bastille Opéra ?
  • The choice of the Gare Paris-Bastille
  • The architecture of the Opera Bastille as seen by Carlos Ott
  • The beginnings of the Bastille Opera House
  • The deterioration of the facade
  • Tours organized by the Opéra Bastille

This walk from the Musée Pompidou to the Place de la Bastille is now over. We’d like to thank you for your confidence in us, and hope you enjoyed the walk to the full.

We’d like to remind you that you’re just 600 m from the Canal Saint Martin, its banks and the romantic promenade that goes with them. A good opportunity to enjoy this bucolic aspect of Paris, by taking the Boulevard Richard-Lenoir from the Place de la Bastille. We intend to publish this relaxing stroll on our website. The next time you’re in Paris, it will probably be available!

In the meantime, we suggest the following self-guided walks:

We wish you an excellent stay in Paris.

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